YouTube TV rockets to top of vMVPD list in 2017

YouTube has been spending big to promote its vMVPD service. According to the latest data from TiVo, the service was used by 9% of consumers in Q4 2017. That would make it more than twice as big as its biggest rival.

YouTube TV ad blitz working

YouTube TV has been on an ad blitz for the last several months. The service was a very visible sponsor of Baseball’s World Series, spent big on other TV ad campaigns, and is doing more of the same this year. It is also advertising extensively to regular YouTube users. According to TiVo’s new Q4 2017 Video Trends Report data, the marketing spending is paying off.

TiVo added YouTube TV to the quarterly survey for the first time in Q4 2017. An amazing 9% say they use the service. The next nearest service, DirectTV Now, has less than half of YouTube TV’s total, and Sling TV has less than a third. We should perhaps treat the YouTube TV number cautiously. It is possible some survey respondents confused YouTube TV with YouTube on TV. That said, even if YouTube TV has just half the number of users as TiVo indicates, it is still the new category leader.

The TiVo numbers suggest the size of the vMVPD market could be much larger than the 4.5 million estimated. Dish Network reports that Sling TV has 2.2 million subscribers. YouTube TV could already have more than 4 million subscribers, and it could also mean the total number of vMVPD subscribers is almost double the previous estimates.

SVOD continues its inexorable advance

TiVo’s data says that SVOD continues to grow in all dimensions. 68% say they use an SVOD service, up more than 4% over the previous year. Netflix continues to dominate, with 55% saying they use the service. 26% use Amazon Prime Video, 17% use Hulu, and 6% use HBO NOW.

Spending on SVOD services increased strongly. The number of people spending more than $15 a month increased from 27% in Q4 2016 to 35% one year later. However, it could be vMVPDs that are driving this number, rather than people subscribing to multiple SVOD services. Only one vMVPD, Sling TV, has a tier below $21 a month. The rest charge $35 or more per month. The increase in the number of people spending over $21 a month was 9%, with 7% paying over $30.

Time spent with the services also increased. 93% of people that subscribe to SVOD services say they use the service every day, 3% higher than two years ago. As well, the number of people that say they use their service for less than 1 hour a month decreased 10%, to 12%. Meanwhile, those using their service for 2 hours a day or more increased dramatically. A third say they watch their SVOD services for more than 3 hours a day, and almost a half watch from 1 to 3 hours per day.

TVOD continues its slow drift downwards

Transactional VOD continues to struggle in the digital era. The number of people saying they had rented or purchased a movie or show online declined slightly over the last year, to 37%. Amazon maintained and slightly extended its lead, with 18% saying they used Amazon’s video store in Q4 2017. Redbox kiosk users fell slightly to 13%. Apple also lost a little ground to Amazon, with only 8% of saying they used iTunes in Q4. Google Play looks as though it may overhaul iTunes this year. It gained slightly more users and is only a little behind iTunes.

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Gen Z discovering music on YouTube, but not listening

Sweety High, a digital media company for Gen Z girls, has released its first Gen Z Music Consumption & Spending Report, which reveals research around the preferences of the powerhouse cohort. According to the report, while YouTube ranks as the top platform for music discovery (75 per cent), more than half of respondents also cite Radio (58 per cent) and Movies and TV Shows they watch (57 per cent) as top sources for exploring new artists.

Additionally, while they may have grown up in an age of reality TV, Gen Z shies away from talent featured on competition shows: they appreciate contestants’ talent but are unlikely to listen to their music after the show ends (78 per cent).

While streaming platforms, like Spotify, ranked second for music discovery (70 per cent), the service is Gen Z’s top choice for frequent listening (61 per cent). YouTube drops to 6th when it comes to general listening (30 per cent), with more Gen Z respondents preferring to listen to music they own, via CDs (38 per cent) or iTunes (36 per cent). When it comes to overall consumption, streaming services have clearly become the new normal, with 66 percent of Gen Z saying they use both for discovery AND listening, vs. Radio (55 per cent) or YouTube (25 per cent).

“Music plays a pivotal role in Gen Z’s lives. They have more options than ever to find undiscovered music, and Gen Z embrace that diversity in their music genres (nearly all, 97 per cent say they listen to 5 different genres regularly) and platforms, blending a mix of new and traditional media options for music discovery and consumption,” said Frank Simonetti, CEO, Sweety High.

Additional key findings from the survey include:

– The majority of this demographic take pride in their variety of music taste (78 per cent) — preferring to listen to a wide range of artists and genres rather than just one style.
– So, what is Gen Z listening to? Pop takes the cake, with more than 3 in 4 respondents claiming it as their top choice in music, followed by Rock (51 per cent) and Rap (50 per cent).
– While only 1 in 5 fans is wooed by a band or artist’s social media presence, 2 out of 3 respondents say they follow artists they like on social and over 80 per cent agree that it’s important for artists to be active on social.
– Love of the music is their top motivation for liking an artist or band (94 per cent), while a shared preference among their friends runs a distant second (36 per cent).
– As to where they find artists and new music, YouTube ranks as the top platform for discovery (75 per cent), followed by streaming services such as Spotify and Pandora (70 per cent), and social networks like Instagram and Facebook (62 per cent).
– Beyond the digital medium, more than half cite Terrestrial Radio (58 per cent) and Movies/TV Shows (57 per cent) as major sources of music discovery.

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YouTube algorithm favors scandalous content

YouTube’s acquisition by Google in 2005 brought a new focus on search to the video sharing company. The shift heralded the birth of the YouTube algorithm. The algorithm helped YouTube morph from an engine driving embedded video at other sites into the top destination for video online.

YouTube’s algorithm dictates what videos to recommend, suggest, relate, and play next, as well as which videos appear in your search results. Over the years it has evolved to maximize ‘watch time’ over ‘views.’ The algorithm helped YouTube win a Peabody award for “promoting democracy,” and Entertainment weekly heralded it as a ‘safe home’ for creators. It was during this time that it came to dominate online video by a very wide margin.

Today, YouTube’s algorithm can predict what users will select even before they know themselves. Personalization and more advanced predictive analytics keep users glued to their screens. As Jim McFadden, the technical head behind ‘suggested videos’ on YouTube, put it:

“We also wanted to serve the needs of people when they didn’t necessarily know what they wanted to look for.”

The approach has been very successful. Speaking at Google IO in 2017, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki said that users watched more than a billion hours of video per day.

With an algorithm as powerful as this, comes great responsibility. Unfortunately, YouTube doesn’t seem able to measure up.

YouTube’s algorithm a big part of the problem

Though incredibly successful at keeping users watching on its platform, YouTube’s success has come at a cost. Though it is effective at choosing videos which are entertaining it is very poor at picking which videos are factual or appropriate.

According to an ex-YouTube insider, the recommendation algorithm has promoted divisive clips and conspiracy videos. For example, during the shooting in Las Vegas, the top video search results on YouTube claimed it was a government conspiracy. Despite all the outrage, the same thing happened again after the recent Florida shooting.

Kids content is not safe either. As nScreenMedia pointed out, many top kids’ channels on YouTube were found to contain disturbing and inappropriate content. One such channel was Toyfreaks, which had 8.53 million subscribers at the time of its removal. Though YouTube apologized for both these and other incidents inappropriate content is still making it onto its kids’ channel.

The biggest controversy, however, came with One of YouTube’s top creators, Logan Paul. A video he posted showed him laughing and joking around a dead body in Japan’s suicide forest. Despite the backlash and negative press it received, and perhaps partly because of it, the video made it onto YouTube’s most watched videos trending page. The video was deleted, and YouTube and Paul apologized profusely. Unfortunately for them, copies of the original video were re-uploaded. Once again, the copies appeared on YouTube’s trending page with one ranked 2nd and another 20th.

YouTube’s algorithm will not change despite the backlash

YouTube has been trying to fix the problem. It has hired thousands of human reviewers to monitor large channels. However, this “whack-a-mole” strategy, of removing videos after there is an uproar, does little to prevent the video from being uploaded in the first place.

YouTube seems unable to deliver a technical or business solution to prevent the cycle of posting of offensive material, public apology, removal, and re-upload.

The bitter truth is that no matter how misinformed, disturbing, or controversial these videos may have been they were watched by millions of people! YouTube’s algorithm prioritizes all that watch time over the appropriateness of the content.

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AT&T still won’t advertise on Youtube

The effects of YouTube’s “adpocalypse” continue to reverberate even after the video platform has changed its practices to help ensure that marketers’ ads will no longer run alongside problematic content. AT&T, which pulled its YouTube ads along with many other brands back in March 2017, has yet to return to the video platform.

According to the New York Times, AT&T’s chief brand officer, Fiona Carter, said that “too much of the content our advertising could appear against was not brand safe — it was objectionable by any measure.” She added that “nothing beats human review” when it comes to determining a video’s brand safety, suggesting that YouTube’s algorithms and filters fall short.

YouTube has already promised that humans would manually review all videos made by creators in the Google Preferred tier, the top five percent of creators in terms of engagement and viewership. “We expect to complete manual reviews of Google Preferred channels and videos by mid-February in the U.S. and by the end of March in all other markets where Google Preferred is offered,” wrote YouTube in a January blog post. The blog post also noted more rigid requirements for channels seeking ad money. Before, a channel just needed 10,000 total views to make it into the Partner Program. Now, it will need at least 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of watch time in the past year to become eligible for advertising revenue.

Still, AT&T isn’t convinced. In fact, the telecommunications company is working on its own alternative to advertising in brand unsafe places like YouTube and Facebook.

In a pitch focused on brand safety, AT&T is touting its own private marketplace for advertising across its OTT properties, DirecTV and DirecTV Now. According to Digiday, which obtained AT&T’s pitch deck, the company’s advertising and analytics CEO Brian Lesser explained how YouTube and Facebook fail to offer a “quality environment” for advertisers and presented AT&T’s new offering as a digital video advertising alternative to brands who care about the entertainment content with which they’re associated.

AT&T’s pitch cites the limited competition in the OTT space (which includes Hulu, YouTube, Sling, and Netflix) and mentions a more tailored, individualized approach to helping agencies place their OTT advertisements.

Meanwhile, brand safety remains as big a concern as ever on YouTube. Between one Logan Paul mishap after another and a whole slew of dubious children’s content, the video platform’s content hasn’t been the most reassuring for brands who decided to pull advertising along with AT&T back in March. That being said, many other brands have put their advertising back on the platform, but with extra cautionary measures in place. JP Morgan Chase, for instance, advertises on YouTube with the help of an internal plugin that the finance giant created itself to ensure its ads are appearing on channels that aren’t home to objectionable content.

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YouTube CEO Responds To Unilever’s Threat

At the Interactive Advertising Bureau’s annual summit on Monday, Unilever’s head of marketing Keith Weed laid down a gauntlet to tech giants like Facebook and Google: Clean up your platforms, or risk seeing the consumer packaged goods giant pull its advertising.

It’s not an idle threat. With an annual ad budget approaching $10 billion, Unilever is one of the world’s largest spenders.

Susan Wojcicki, the CEO of Google-owned YouTube, responded Monday night at Recode’s Code Media conference. “We take their feedback very seriously. We are an advertiser-supported platform,” Wojcicki said.

“We want to do the right set of things to build [Unilever’s] trust. They are building brands on YouTube, and we want to be sure that our brand is the right place to build their brand.”

She added that “based on the feedback we had from them,” YouTube changed its rules for what channels could be monetized, and began to have humans review all videos uploaded to Google Preferred, the company’s premium monetization product.

Wojcicki added that YouTube still has different relationships with different advertisers, and is attempting to balance the needs of giants like Unilever with direct-response advertisers that collectively make up a big chunk of the site’s ad revenue.

“Not all advertisers are the same. Some are very brand-sensitive, and some are saying, “you know what, we are more focused on direct-response — we are OK with content being a little edgier,’” she said.

Her comments come as YouTube continues to grapple with the brand safety fallout from Logan Paul, the YouTuber thrust into the spotlight after uploading a video that showed him and his friends finding a dead body.

Wojcicki noted that the company suspended its projects with him, and this week suspended all advertising from his account after he posted more offensive videos.

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‘Fiction is outperforming reality’: how YouTube’s algorithm distorts truth

It was one of January’s most viral videos. Logan Paul, a YouTube celebrity, stumbles across a dead man hanging from a tree. The 22-year-old, who is in a Japanese forest famous as a suicide spot, is visibly shocked, then amused. “Dude, his hands are purple,” he says, before turning to his friends and giggling. “You never stand next to a dead guy?”

Paul, who has 16 million mostly teen subscribers to his YouTube channel, removed the video from YouTube 24 hours later amid a furious backlash. It was still long enough for the footage to receive 6m views and a spot on YouTube’s coveted list of trending videos.

The next day, I watched a copy of the video on YouTube. Then I clicked on the “Up next” thumbnails of recommended videos that YouTube showcases on the right-hand side of the video player. This conveyor belt of clips, which auto-play by default, are designed to seduce us to spend more time on Google’s video broadcasting platform. I was curious where they might lead.

The answer was a slew of videos of men mocking distraught teenage fans of Logan Paul, followed by CCTV footage of children stealing things and, a few clicks later, a video of children having their teeth pulled out with bizarre, homemade contraptions.

I had cleared my history, deleted my cookies, and opened a private browser to be sure YouTube was not personalising recommendations. This was the algorithm taking me on a journey of its own volition, and it culminated with a video of two boys, aged about five or six, punching and kicking one another.

“I’m going to post it on YouTube,” said a teenage girl, who sounded like she might be an older sibling. “Turn around and punch the heck out of that little boy.” They scuffled for several minutes until one had knocked the other’s tooth out.

There are 1.5 billion YouTube users in the world, which is more than the number of households that own televisions. What they watch is shaped by this algorithm, which skims and ranks billions of videos to identify 20 “up next” clips that are both relevant to a previous video and most likely, statistically speaking, to keep a person hooked on their screen.

Company insiders tell me the algorithm is the single most important engine of YouTube’s growth. In one of the few public explanations of how the formula works – that sketches the algorithm’s deep neural networks, crunching a vast pool of data about videos and the people who watch them – YouTube engineers describe it as one of the “largest scale and most sophisticated industrial recommendation systems in existence”.

Lately, it has also become one of the most controversial. The algorithm has been found to be promoting conspiracy theories about the Las Vegas mass shooting and incentivising, through recommendations, a thriving subculture that targets children with disturbing content such as cartoons in which the British children’s character Peppa Pig eats her father or drinks bleach.

Lewd and violent videos have been algorithmically served up to toddlers watching YouTube Kids, a dedicated app for children. One YouTube creator who was banned from making advertising revenues from his strange videos – which featured his children receiving flu shots, removing earwax, and crying over dead pets – told a reporter he had only been responding to the demands of Google’s algorithm. “That’s what got us out there and popular,” he said. “We learned to fuel it and do whatever it took to please the algorithm.”

Google has responded to these controversies in a process akin to Whac-A-Mole: expanding the army of human moderators, removing offensive YouTube videos identified by journalists and de-monetising the channels that create them. But none of those moves has diminished a growing concern that something has gone profoundly awry with the artificial intelligence powering YouTube.

Yet one stone has so far been largely unturned. Much has been written about Facebook and Twitter’s impact on politics, but in recent months academics have speculated that YouTube’s algorithms may have been instrumental in fuelling disinformation during the 2016 presidential election. “YouTube is the most overlooked story of 2016,” Zeynep Tufekci, a widely respected sociologist and technology critic, tweeted back in October. “Its search and recommender algorithms are misinformation engines.”

If YouTube’s recommendation algorithm really has evolved to promote more disturbing content, how did that happen? And what is it doing to our politics?

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Ad-spend on YouTube, Facebook to grow 130% in 5 years

Data from Juniper Research has found that advertising spend on FVoD (Free Video on Demand) content, such as media on YouTube and Facebook, will surge over the next 5 years, reaching $37 billion (€29.9bn) by 2022. This is up from an estimated $16 billion in 2017.

In addition, unique users of such content will reach just under 4.5 billion globally by 2022, as the appetite for free video media continues its expanse.

OTT’s Push Live Content

The research report, Digital TV & Video: Network and OTT Strategies 2017-2022, found that leading FVoD provider YouTube, which sees over 1 billion hours watched per day, will face increasing competition from social media platforms. It observed that the delivery of live video content via social media channels will be one of the growth areas for 2018, as users increase the volume of live broadcast content posted to these platforms. Such examples include Instagram, which has over 800 million monthly active users, and Snapchat which has 178 million daily active users.

Research author Lauren Foye explained: “This content will increasingly be of interest to advertisers, especially in view of Facebook’s monthly active user base of over 2 billion people. The company has launched an app and website ‘Facebook for Creators’ to help users refine video content and generate viewership.”

Juniper found that this will aid growth in content consumption, with data usage from OTT content surpassing 840 Exabytes by 2022, the equivalent of 129 billion hours of 4K streaming.

Pressure from Advertisers

Recent changes to YouTube’s Partner Program means that it will only accept channels with more than 1,000 subscribers, and 4,000 viewing hours acquired across a year, to its shared advertising revenue programme. This change in strategy results from increased advertiser pressure following several high-profile, offensive, video posts by users. Nevertheless, Juniper forecasts YouTube to account for almost a quarter of all FVoD ad spend by 2022.

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YouTube Is Finally Addressing Brand Safety Fears With These 3 Changes

After nearly a year of complaints from advertisers concerned about their ads appearing alongside questionable content and a slew of its biggest influencers going rogue on the platform, YouTube is revamping its policies for how creators make money off of their videos.

Over the past year, YouTube has tweaked several of its policies, upping the requirement for channels to hit 10,000 views, for example, and adding more staffers to vet videos. Still, brand safety has quickly become a more mainstream problem for brands. As of just last week at CES, execs were quick to point to brand safety concerns as among their biggest gripes with Google and Facebook.

“While we took several steps last year to protect advertisers from inappropriate content, we know we need to do more to ensure that their ads run alongside content that reflects their values,” wrote Paul Muret, vp of display, video and analytics at YouTube, in a blog post.

Here are the three steps YouTube is taking:

1. Buh-bye programmatic premium ads

Google Preferred, YouTube’s program that allows brands to only run ads against the most popular 5 percent of content, is billed as the site’s top-tier program for the its most premium content.

While those ad buys are limited to a small section of video channels, creators’ individual videos are not vetted. That can be a problem for brands: Think Logan Paul’s controversial “Suicide Forest” video that got the star kicked out of Google Preferred or PewDiePie’s anti-Semitic messages that caused brands to back away from his videos.

To avoid such problems, YouTube is now manually screening each individual video for Google Preferred channels, which should cut down on the number of lone videos that make their way through YouTube’s programmatic pipes. According to Google, Google Preferred channels and videos in the U.S. will be vetted by mid-February and will be finished globally by the end of March.

2. Moving beyond views

Until now, creators were given permission to be part of YouTube’s Partner Program—in other words, how people make money off of clips—based on how many views a channel had.

Although YouTube did increase the requirement to 10,000 total views in April, “it’s been clear over the last few months that we need the right requirements and better signals to identify the channels that have earned the right to run ads,” Muret wrote.

Now YouTube channels will need to amass 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of watch time in a one-year period to run ads. Both new and existing channels will have to meet the new requirements, which go into effect on Feb. 20.

In addition to views, YouTube staff will also monitor spam, community strikes and flags of abuse as qualifiers for whether or not a channel can make money off of clips.

According to Google, 99 percent of the channels that will be affected by the new guidelines make less than $100 from advertising every year, meaning the vast majority of channels affected do not make much money off of YouTube.

3. Tiered media buys

YouTube is rolling out a three-tiered system for brand safety that allows brands more transparency into where their ads appear.

One option caters to brands that are sensitive about where their ads appear. On the other end, a broad-based option lets brands buy ads across a bigger section of videos. The middle option—which is the default option—plays between, with targeted ads that still reach a significant number of channels.

Whether or not the changes will cause brands to pour more money and trust into Google has yet to be seen, but agencies see the moves as important steps from one of the world’s biggest advertising platforms.

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How To Use YouTube For ECommerce Sales

Video marketing works for every sector and especially eCommerce sector can go with the better results by concerning the video as their key in marketing strategy. YouTube platform is more than the social for networking platforms which provides the marketers with a possibility for the interaction and reach the customers.

YouTube video ranks at the top place in search engines. So, being an eCommerce YouTube marketer itself brings advantage to the eCommerce marketers online. eCommerce is a growing sector of the web.

There is a huge competition across the various marketing places like Amazon, Flipkart and many other e-commerce shopping sites. It becomes challenging to grab the consumers’ attention towards your new e-commerce site from this competition.

Ways To Use YouTube For ECommerce Sales
YouTube is the best destination to increase the visibility of your eCommerce store online. YouTube videos has good ranking on major search engines especially on Google search engine. Here are some best ways to get more sales leads using the YouTube for eCommerce.

Go with short video content:

YouTube platform provides the eCommerce marketers with various types of ads such as TrueView ads, Banner ads and much other type of ads which can helps your eCommerce business to drive sales.

The short video content has the better engagement with the audience as the audience doesn’t like to watch the long form of content.

Create YouTube channel for your brand:

Create branded YouTube channel with perfect logo and design of the channel along with the attractive and interesting Metadata which plays a great role in achieving good exposure and reach. So, always go with best keywords to get good exposure.

Make frequent uploads and cross promote your eCommerce site:

Upload the videos frequently and get impressive impression from the viewers. Cross promote your eCommerce video link on to the various social media platforms like Facebook and encourage the audience to get connected with your YouTube video.

The Shoppable videos:

Shoppable videos are the new trend today. YouTube was allowing the marketers in creating the Shoppable videos which has greater demand and good results on YouTube platform.

The Shoppable videos can increase the sales of your eCommerce as they can directly take the customer to your site landing page after the user clicks on to the product in the video itself.

How To Increase YouTube Visibility For Your ECommerce Store

YouTube curates quality videos for its users basing on the relevancy and the quality as the main considerations. So, it is important to maintain the relevancy and the quality of your videos to get identified among the millions of YouTube videos on the YouTube platform.

eCommerce YouTube marketing was in practice by some millions of eCommerce stores with a variety of videos and ads. So, here are some ways to increase your visibility for your eCommerce stores. Here are the Ways to increase visibility using the YouTube.

Create a Channel for your eCommerce stores:

Create a separate channel for your eCommerce store by creating best background, titles, description of the channel while creation. This will have an impact on the visibility on Youtube.

Use Google paid advertising services:

By using the Google AdWords, you can make your video searchable in the search engines which can helps you to increase the visibility levels. Include appropriate AdWords in the description and the video titles and tags which can helps you more.

Create and upload product related or services related videos with the name of your eCommerce stores:

Create product videos by explaining your products and the services to the viewers in a different interesting ways and capture their attention.

Include your eCommerce stores URL in videos:

The audience can click on to the URL to know more about your eCommerce store if they like your videos on Youtube. So, there are good chances to get visibility.

Increasing Of Sales With ECommerce YouTube Channel

Ecommerce companies were looking forward to raise their sales. an official channel of the business can help them towards their target in which they can approach with the trailers of their channel innovatively to attract the audience towards the trailer which can leads to brand awareness in the people.

The channel helps the eCommerce to market their products with different types of videos to increase the branding and sales.They can also add different YouTube channel art along with the graphical content for the explanation of their brands on YouTube.

The channel description also very helpful for the marketers, YouTube can give the options to share towards the cross platforms which is a good opportunity for the marketers to share their trailers and product related videos to the wide range of audience on the web.

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Blokchain-browser makes its way into Youtube

Brave, the blockchain-based browser initiative that raised $35 million in an ICO earlier this year, is making its first major move to build an ecosystem that rewards publishers in a new kind of way.

One of the selling points of Brave is that it uses its token (BAT, Basic Attention Token) to disrupt the current financial norms of online publishing. The company wants to reward users for browsing the web, while also helping to make advertising less intrusive and more relevant. In another important focus, it wants to use BAT to let readers reward content makers whose websites they visit.

That’s where its new push this week is focused on. Brave is giving its users a total of 300,000 BAT tokens — worth around $60,000 — over the next 30 days. Users typically earn tokens by using Brave, but this promotion will put additional credit in there, which can then be given directly to publishers or YouTube channel operators.

That’s a fairly major move given that Brave claims to have one million monthly users and, on the publisher side, over 1,100 websites and 600 YouTube channels as content partners. YouTube was added to the platform last month.

Users will get a maximum of $5 in BAT over the next 30 days — or until the token allocated is reached — which will be added to their Brave payment wallet. That wallet can be used to ‘tip’ websites that they visit based on time spent on the site.

The default, for example, allocates the total tip jar based on the percentage of time that a Brave user has spent on Brave-verified websites and YouTube channels. It can be overridden, however, to allow a user to tip whatever they like to whichever website they like.

In effect, Brave is boosting the wallets of its users with this offer giving them greater potential to tip their favorite content creators, who can convert the BAT into fiat currency.

“It is one of many steps toward dealing users back in for a fair deal, and dealing out the toxic middle players,” Brave CEO Brendan Eich, who was formerly in charge of Mozilla, told TechCrunch in a statement.

“We are moving from good-will contributions to user grants to private ads that share the bulk of the gross ad revenue with the user, without any targeting or tracking by remote parties (including Brave),” he added.

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