Tag Archives: strategy

Is Amazon’s video strategy working?

Amazon is taking a strikingly different approach to Prime Video than rivals such as Netflix and Hulu are with their services. Rather than bundle content together into a single offering, it is providing most of the video in channels that customers must subscribe to separately. It is working very hard to build up the number of channels available to cover every niche and content genre a viewer could possibly want.

There are already 120 content services available through Amazon Channels. The company continues to press to expand that list. It is rumored to be in negotiations with “dozens” of smaller cable channels to buy them. TV channels providing content with unencumbered rights (rights that aren’t locked into exclusive distribution agreements) are of the most interest. Amazon will be able to launch them quickly to a global audience as part of Channels.

Amazon is not just waiting around for other providers to fill out the content available through Prime Video. It is working with companies directly to fill out important genre categories. For example, animated content creator Genius Brands International is partnering with Amazon in the creation of a channel offering targeted at children. Kids Genius Cartoons Plus! will be available Thursday to Amazon Prime members for $3.99 per month. Genius properties such as Baby Genius and Thomas Edison’s Secret Lab will be available as well as non-Genius shows such as Inspector Gadget and Carl Squad.

Building the library of included content with originals, sports

Amazon recognizes that a large collection of content available as part of a basic subscription is critical to success. It gives customers a no-commitment reason to go to the video portal. Once there, Amazon can use its marketing muscle to get them to subscribe to other content. That is why it has committed to spending $4 billion this year on original content. It is spreading the investment around in genre’s like comedy (The Tick), drama (Mozart in the Jungle), and Crime (Bosch.)

It is also plunging into the world of premium sports. Amazon members will be able to watch ten Thursday football games this season, starting this week with the Bears versus Packers. This is the first time Amazon has streamed live content as part of Prime Video membership. It will be a test of the home-grown streaming platform that Amazon uses, as live streaming continues to be challenging for providers.

Is Amazon’s strategy working?

Amazon doesn’t provide any specifics on how many people are watching the content it provides through Prime Video. Luckily, there are other data sources we can draw on to assess how well it is doing.

Last year, Clearleap reported that 75% of Amazon Prime members say they watch video available through the platform. Most, however, see Prime Video as a nice bonus, not the main reason to subscribe. Still, if most of the 66 million Prime members are using the video apps that is certainly a big win for the company. Unfortunately, engagement still lags well behind other online video providers.

According to comScore, Netflix and Hulu are used more than twice as much as Amazon Video. Hulu streaming households watch 28 hours and 54 minutes a month, while Netflix homes watch 26 hours and 54 minutes a month. Amazon video streaming homes watch just 10 hours and 42 minutes a month.

This data strongly suggests that Amazon customers start looking for video somewhere else before they turn to Prime Video. For Amazon to be successful, it will need to reposition Prime Video as the first place its customers turn to when they want entertainment video on television.

YouTube: What’s Your Video Strategy There?

We’re always focused on gaps when it comes to our clients’ digital marketing strategy. Search engines aren’t just a channel for businesses and consumers to find the brands they’re looking for, the algorithms are also an outstanding indicator of a brand’s authority online. As we analyze the content that’s driving attention to the brand, we compare the content on each competitor’s site to see what the differences are.

Quite often, one of those differentiators is video. There are several types of videos that can be produced, but explainer videos, how-to videos, and customer testimonials are the most impactful for businesses. How-to and style videos on YouTube receive an average of 8,332 views Tweet This!, the most popular category next to entertainment videos.

If it’s time to compete with video content, I’d recommend your company put together a balanced strategy:

Put aside a significant budget for an explainer video that’s up to 2 minutes long. Remember that this video is going to stick with you for a while, so ensuring consistent branding, removing any time-specific mentions, and teasing the future would be a great strategy. An animated video that performs well may be $5k to $10k – but a great return on investment.
Take every opportunity you can to film testimonial videos. Even if it means that you hire film crews and send them to your customers, you should absolutely invest in it. Testimonials are indicators of trust that can not be beaten. They can also be repurposed for written content throughout all of your digital and print mediums. Don’t underestimate the power of an emotional testimonial on your company.

Work on thought leadership videos that spotlight the human resources and culture of your company that differentiates you from competitors. For efficiency, we often schedule an entire day or two of shooting of the leaders of the business. By doing this, we can create spotlight videos that focus on one person at a time, or we can mix and match thematic videos on different topics.
Don’t forget that videos aren’t just a fantastic asset for your site, YouTube itself continues to lead online searches next to Google. Optimize your YouTube channel and each of your videos for maximum impact. Produce other videos on a regular basis to build subscribers and start a community of your own.

What’s around the corner? Live video. YouTube is jumping heads first into the live streaming game. We’re still early, but sometimes that’s the best time to jump into an emerging technology. Before the big brands make the investment, smaller agile businesses can take advantage and drive some great market share. It’s definitely a gamble – but we’ve seen it pay off over and over again.

This infographic from Visual Z Studios will provide you with the overview of how critical this channel is when working with video.

read more here:

https://martech.zone/youtube-video-strategy/

Video Is Not Display, So Publishers Should Stop Using Display CPM Strategies

– by Yoav Naveh

The concept of online advertising has long been associated with the standard banner ad – the square unit that consumers breeze past as they scroll down a page.

That’s changing rapidly, though, as video viewership grows and introduces more opportunities for engaging video ads. As a result, video ad spending is predicted to grow by 12% this year while traditional banner spending shrinks, according to JP Morgan.

Publishers have long relied on display as their primary revenue source. As a result, many of the publisher-focused technology solutions have addressed display ad selling. But video isn’t sold or served in the exact same way as display advertising, which means that established tactics aren’t necessarily transferable.

For instance, when publishers try to optimize toward the highest CPM with video, as they do with display, they run the risk of inconsistent fill rates and long load times. Rather than trying to mimic display strategies, publishers need to look for a strategy that leads to the same desired outcome, rather than a direct technological equivalent. In video, that means optimizing toward overall ad revenue rather than CPMs.

Video advertising is far more technologically intense than display. VPAID tags can take 10 seconds or more to fire and actually load an ad, and some ad calls time out, resulting in no actual payment to the publisher. With all this heavy lifting, publishers want to maximize the chances they’ll get paid for every potential video impression. As a result, many are loading up on video ad networks to get the highest CPMs possible.

Unfortunately, this focus on CPM has a downside. Adding more networks means adding more tags, which means even longer load times. To make matters worse, the entity that wins a video ad auction may not always pay for the impression. This may be attributable to technological errors at times, but a delinquent buyer is most likely rooted in video’s archaic arbitrage practice, where even prominent supply-side platforms own seats on demand-side platforms and bid for impressions.

These attempts to buy up inventory and resell it for a higher fee have created a mess of a consumer experience and set up a very dangerous house of cards for publishers. A buyer trying to resell an impression can push the load time toward 20 seconds or more. These excruciatingly long load times lead to user abandonment, which can cause traffic to crater, thereby bringing fewer ad impressions and ultimately resulting in no business at all for the publisher. Maxing out on ad networks in an attempt to optimize for CPMs in this way is not optimizing for revenue, especially if it has the potential to destroy revenue and the online user experience altogether.

What are publishers to do if they want to maximize return in the increasingly competitive video market? Rather than optimize impressions around the highest CPM, publishers need to take the longer view toward revenue, which is part and parcel with understanding fill rates and load time.

The first step is shifting the focus toward revenue per thousand page views, or RPM, rather than the CPMs from auctions. Simple A/B testing should provide a clearer understanding of this metric. Publishers may find a new partner can generate $20,000 RPM, which is great. But if that source is potentially taking $25,000 away from another bidder, then that’s a net loss of $5,000 per thousand page views. Getting the highest CPM for each impression might provide a real-time rush for the publisher, but careful analysis needs to be done to ensure that a quick thrill won’t negatively impact long-term revenue success.

read more here:

https://adexchanger.com/the-sell-sider/video-not-display-publishers-stop-using-display-cpm-strategies/