Gen Z discovering music on YouTube, but not listening

Sweety High, a digital media company for Gen Z girls, has released its first Gen Z Music Consumption & Spending Report, which reveals research around the preferences of the powerhouse cohort. According to the report, while YouTube ranks as the top platform for music discovery (75 per cent), more than half of respondents also cite Radio (58 per cent) and Movies and TV Shows they watch (57 per cent) as top sources for exploring new artists.

Additionally, while they may have grown up in an age of reality TV, Gen Z shies away from talent featured on competition shows: they appreciate contestants’ talent but are unlikely to listen to their music after the show ends (78 per cent).

While streaming platforms, like Spotify, ranked second for music discovery (70 per cent), the service is Gen Z’s top choice for frequent listening (61 per cent). YouTube drops to 6th when it comes to general listening (30 per cent), with more Gen Z respondents preferring to listen to music they own, via CDs (38 per cent) or iTunes (36 per cent). When it comes to overall consumption, streaming services have clearly become the new normal, with 66 percent of Gen Z saying they use both for discovery AND listening, vs. Radio (55 per cent) or YouTube (25 per cent).

“Music plays a pivotal role in Gen Z’s lives. They have more options than ever to find undiscovered music, and Gen Z embrace that diversity in their music genres (nearly all, 97 per cent say they listen to 5 different genres regularly) and platforms, blending a mix of new and traditional media options for music discovery and consumption,” said Frank Simonetti, CEO, Sweety High.

Additional key findings from the survey include:

– The majority of this demographic take pride in their variety of music taste (78 per cent) — preferring to listen to a wide range of artists and genres rather than just one style.
– So, what is Gen Z listening to? Pop takes the cake, with more than 3 in 4 respondents claiming it as their top choice in music, followed by Rock (51 per cent) and Rap (50 per cent).
– While only 1 in 5 fans is wooed by a band or artist’s social media presence, 2 out of 3 respondents say they follow artists they like on social and over 80 per cent agree that it’s important for artists to be active on social.
– Love of the music is their top motivation for liking an artist or band (94 per cent), while a shared preference among their friends runs a distant second (36 per cent).
– As to where they find artists and new music, YouTube ranks as the top platform for discovery (75 per cent), followed by streaming services such as Spotify and Pandora (70 per cent), and social networks like Instagram and Facebook (62 per cent).
– Beyond the digital medium, more than half cite Terrestrial Radio (58 per cent) and Movies/TV Shows (57 per cent) as major sources of music discovery.

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OTT: the importance of personal profiles

Personal profiles are favoured by over half of OTT TV viewers, according to the findings of the latest report by SPB TV.

Surveying 50,000 respondents out of its 60 million-user base, though mainly targeted at emerging markets and migrant communities worldwide, SPB TV Survey 2016 A Slice of Personalization found that the share of respondents already using such profiles, which allow users to createtheir own content collections, access their viewing history, select a name and avatar, and much more, is inversely correlated to their age.

It is the largest among the GenerationZ users and the Millennials (27% in both age groups) and the lowest among the Baby Boomers (14% of respondents).

However, there is no reason to believe that only younger viewers are interested in administering their personal space in the service.

The percentage of respondents saying they are not interested in this feature slightly increases from 36% among the Generation Z viewers to 55% among the Silent Generation, confirming that even among the 71+ respondents almost a half use or would like to use personal profiles.

The survey also notes that while the value of personal profiles on shared in-home devices, like smart TVs and set-top boxes, is widely disputed in the

Indeed, almost half of respondents are certain they want to have their profiles available on shared screens. This answer is the most often cited by all age groups – from 39% among the Baby Boomers to 49% among the respondents aged under 36.

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