Tag Archives: Facebook

Facebook acquires streaming rights to sports

Facebook isn’t ready to make a high-profile bid for major sports like basketball, football or soccer in established markets, but it’s eyeing up rights in emerging markets.

One interesting example is Facebook’s move trying to convince UEFA’s media bosses to let it live stream Champions League games in countries where they aren’t shown on TV. Both tournaments are not shown on TV in Africa or countries like India and Colombia. One big fly in the ointment: Facebook wants the rights for free under the idea that it would give the Champions League and Europa League tournaments tremendous reach outside of Europe. Needless to say, UEFA declined.

UEFA cannot be seen giving away rights for free when it has a premium product for which other broadcast partners pay substantial sums. UEFA now finds itself in the same precarious situation as publishers when it comes to assessing the platform dilemma of reach versus monetization.

“It is indeed good to be broadcast on Facebook in a market where the matches aren’t shown on TV,” said the source. “But on the other hand, it could damage negotiations in the future with other TV channels.”

The UEFA pitch is curious since Facebook was willing to pony up $600 million to bring the Indian Premier League cricket matches to the more than 1 billion people who live in India and its surrounding countries.

It is unlikely UEFA’s initial rejection will sap Facebook’s appetite for the rights. With over 650 million people following an account for a sports team, player or news outlet on Facebook and 200 million of these fans on Instagram, Facebook knows it has strong bargaining power now that it is a primary destination for sports. Misha Sher, vp of sport and entertainment at MediaCom, believes it’s only a matter of time before the biggest soccer games air live on Facebook. “Rights holders will need to consider the value that someone like Amazon or Facebook can bring to the table, and explore what types of models will work moving forward without undermining any existing broadcast agreements,” Sher said.

Facebook has made no secret of soccer’s importance to its aspirations as a broadcaster. It aired over 3,500 different live sports events in the first six months of the year alone. Despite the breadth of sports it shows, from American football to college lacrosse, Facebook insists it doesn’t want to replace traditional broadcasters such as Sky and BT Sport as the home of live games. Instead, the social network has cited its deal with Fox Sports to live stream Champions League matches in the U.S. as an example of its intentions over the coming months. If Facebook were to be the sole broadcaster of the Champions League in the U.S. now, it would likely struggle to recoup the $60 million Turner Sports paid to secure the broadcast rights for 2018-2021.

Monetizing video is still a problem for Facebook, as seen by the number of soccer clubs and advertisers rethinking Facebook Live’s value alongside the emergence of Facebook Watch. Monetizing video in emerging markets, however, could be easier; of Facebook’s 5 million advertisers, 70 percent are outside of the U.S. Among the fastest-growing countries are India, Thailand, Brazil, Mexico and Argentina, none of which are set to broadcast Champions League matches on TV between 2018 and 2021.

But this path isn’t without its problems, said Dror Ginzberg, the CEO of video creation platform Wochit. In many emerging markets, smartphone adoption is roughly 30 percent, according to Gsma, the trade body for the telecommunications industry. This is much lower than the global average of over 50 percent. In the short term, this may mean monetization could be slow to happen in these markets, especially as premium content such as the Champions League, regardless of location, is expensive, explained Ginzberg.

read more here:

https://digiday.com/marketing/facebook-looks-emerging-markets-streaming-rights-sports/

Google and Facebook Exposed to Disruption via GDPR

Substantial parts of Google and Facebook’s business will be disrupted by the EU’s new GDPR data protection rules that are due to apply in May 2018, according to Dr Johnny Ryan PageFair, a company that specialises in helping publishers monetise their inventory in the face of ad-blocking.

Under the new rules, both Google and Facebook will be unable to use the personal data they hold for advertising purposes without user permission. Ryan says this presents an “acute challenge” as they cannot use a service-wide opt-in for everything, in spite of the fact that many commentators have suggested otherwise. Nor will they be able to deny access to their services to users who refuse to opt-in to tracking.

When a person uses Google or Facebook.com, they willingly discloses personal data. Both companies have the right to process these data to provide their services when one asks them to. However, the application of the GDPR will prevent them from using these personal data for any further purpose unless the user permits.

However, it depends what the data will be used for. As Ryan notes, “it will be necessary to ask for consent, or present an opt-out choice, at different times, and for different things. This creates varying levels of risk.”

To explain the varying degrees of exposure to risk, PageFair have devised “The GDPR Scale”:

Google has a Large Number of Products Exposed to GDPR

PageFair’s estimate of Google, when applied to the GDPR scale, shows a significant range of products at four on the scale. However, some part of that set of products can be modified, which would lower their score from four to one, which would put them out of the scope of the regulation.

read more here:

https://videoadnews.com/2017/08/30/google-and-facebook-are-significantly-exposed-to-disruption-via-gdpr/

Facebook Pages that share false news won’t be able to buy ads

The company has already been working with outside fact-checkers like Snopes and the AP to flag inaccurate news stories. (These aren’t supposed to be stories that are disputed for reasons of opinion or partisanship, but rather outright hoaxes and lies.) It also says that when a story is marked as disputed, the link can can no longer be promoted through Facebook ads.

The next step, which the company is announcing today, involves stopping Pages that regularly share these stories from buying any Facebook ads at all, regardless of whether or not the ad includes a disputed link.

Facebook was criticized last year for its role in helping to spread of fake/false news. (The company is using the term “false news” for now — “fake news” has become heavily politicized and almost meaningless.) Product Director Rod Leathern said the company has been trying to fight back in three ways — ending the economic incentive to post false news stories, slowing the spread of those stories and helping people make more informed decisions when they see a false story.

In this case, Leathern said blocking ad-buying is meant to change the economic incentives. Facebook is concerned that “there are Pages posting this information that are using Facebook Ads to build audiences” to spread false news. By changing the ad policy, Facebook makes it harder for companies to attract that audience.

read more here:
https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/28/facebook-fake-news-ads/?ncid=rss&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Nielsen to Credit Video Views on Facebook, Hulu and YouTube

Broadening its visibility into the world of digital video and OTT distribution, Nielsen said it will begin crediting video content distributed on Facebook, Hulu and YouTube.

That added capability, delivered via Nielsen’s Digital Content Ratings, will enable TV and digital publisher clients to capture viewing of their content within their reported audience numbers, Nielsen said, noting that this “consistent and transparent view ensures a level playing field” because it provides access to the same information across both publishers and platforms.
While enabled publisher clients will be able to receive credit for video offered on Facebook and YouTube in Nielsen’s Digital Content Ratings, Hulu will be providing “select media partners” with credit for current series content that it distributes, Nielsen said.

That expansion follows Nielsen’s announcement last month that “eligible TV viewing” from YouTube TV and Hulu’s new live TV service would be included in its Digital in TV Ratings.

“The inclusion of video content distributed on Facebook, Hulu and YouTube in Nielsen Digital Content Ratings is a major accomplishment and part of our ongoing commitment to providing the industry with independent, comprehensive measurement of the evolving consumer landscape,” Megan Clarken, president of product leadership at Nielsen, said in a statement. “Through capturing this audience, Nielsen is providing publishers, agencies and advertisers with a better picture of today’s media consumption, with comparable metrics.”

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http://www.multichannel.com/news/advanced-advertising/nielsen-credit-video-views-facebook-hulu-and-youtube/414612

Facebook Launches Watch en here’s how you signup

Is Facebook TV? The social network introduced its Watch tab yesterday, along with its first pieces of original content. Watch is staring off with limited availability in the United States, and will be available on desktop, mobile, and TV devices. It will expand to more viewers in the coming weeks.

As Facebook relies more and more on video, the Watch tab gives members a dedicated place to find live and recorded content. Shows are episodic, and Watch has its own watchlist so people know what to view next.

Organised lists help the Watch tab feel social. Viewers will see groupings such as “Most Talked About” and “What’s Making People Laugh” that make viewing a community activity. They can see “What Friends Are Watching” for more personal recommendations. Viewers can also post comments and see those from other people.

Viewers can even get involved in shaping some of the programming. In “Returning the Favor,” for example, Mike Rowe helps out people who are helping their communities. Those people are nominated by the Facebook audience. Debut Watch content includes a science show from National Geographic, a kids’ cooking show from Tastemade, a show about celebrity moms from Time Inc, and live Friday night games from MLB. While Facebook funded its first shows with a select group of producers, it plans to open the area up to all creators in the future. The launch includes content from A&E, Hearst, Time Inc., and more.

Creators will be able to monetize their shows through ad breaks and brand sponsorships. Creators will keep 55 percent of ad revenue, while Facebook will take 45 percent. Anyone interested in creating a show is invited to drop Facebook a note.

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http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/News/Online-Video-News/Facebook-Launches-Watch-Tab-and-Original-Shows-to-Select-Users-119823.aspx

Facebook ventures into targeted real estate advertising

Facebook has launched its first ad product designed specifically for residential real estate brokerages.

“Dynamic Ads for Real Estate,” first reported by real estate news site Inman News, allow real estate brokers and agents to advertise directly to Facebook and Instagram users who have already searched for properties on that brokerage’s website. The product goes after a key money maker for Seattle-based Zillow, which allows real estate professionals to advertise to prospective home buyers and sellers on its site.

The new real estate product connects Facebook’s ad platform with a brokerage’s search data to understand a user’s preferences, then automatically shows that user relevant listings from the brokerage’s inventory. The ads are served on Facebook and Instagram.

“Real estate is an area we’re betting big on as a company,” Facebook’s real estate and financial services chief Keith Watts told Inman. “We think its content that consumers want to see.”

In October, Zillow rolled out a new feature that allows its Premier Agents to advertise to Facebook users under a partnership between the two tech companies. It’s not clear how Facebook’s move into real estate ads relates to that partnership. GeekWire reached out to Zillow for additional details and will update this story when we hear back.

“We’re really comfortable aligning our brand with you all, some of the finest real estate professionals in the world,” Greg Schwartz, Zillow Group chief business officer, said at a conference where the Facebook collaboration was announced. “But in technology partnerships we’re extremely choosy.”

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https://www.geekwire.com/2017/facebook-ventures-zillows-territory-targeted-real-estate-advertising/

Facebook’s Premium Video Section Will Arrive in Mid-August

Facebook’s first efforts in premium video programming are almost here. According to Bloomberg, the social network will offer TV-style shows in a new video section in mid-August.

While this section will include user-generated content, as well, the highlight will be professional content. Facebook has commissioned several short-form series for the area, as well as long-form premium content. News broke in June that Facebook is bankrolling some of its lead-off programs with six-figure budgets.

Premium video will include Last State Standing, a reality competition show, and Loosely Exactly Nicole, which continues a show that originally ran on MTV. These large-budget shows won’t be available at the August launch, but the short-form commissioned series will. Facebook doesn’t plan to fund premium shows going forward, but did so this time to jumpstart the area.

Facebook’s goal with premium video is taking a share of the television industry’s $70 billion ad market. Viewers won’t be limited to computer viewing, as Facebook announced apps for a variety of connected TV devices—including Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and Samsung Smart TV—earlier this year.

Bloomberg reports the video area was originally scheduled to launch a month ago, but has been impacted by delays. Facebook currently has over 2 billion members.

Facebook Raked in $9.16 Billion in Ad Revenue in the Second Quarter of 2017

Facebook reported advertising revenue of $9.16 billion in the second quarter of 2017, a 47 percent increase over the same quarter last year.

In its quarterly earnings report released today, the social giant beat analysts’ expectations with a total revenue of $9.3 billion—an increase of 45 percent year-over-year. Mobile now makes up around 87 percent of the company’s overall ad revenue, up from 84 percent in second-quarter 2016.

Earnings per share for the second quarter totaled $1.32, up from 78 cents during the same period last year.

The company also reported an increase in both daily and monthly active users, with daily active users totaling an average of 1.32 billion in June for a 17 percent increase year-over-year. Monthly active users also increased 17 percent year-over-year to total 2.01 billion as of June 30. (Facebook officially announced last month that it had hit the 2 billion mark.)

“We had a good second quarter and first half of the year,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said today in a statement. “Our community is now two billion people and we’re focusing on bringing the world closer together.”

Facebook also reported an overall growth in head count. As of the end of last month, the company had 20,658 employees—an increase of 43 percent year-over-year.

While second quarter earnings were plenty strong, it does show a bit of deceleration—the company reported a 59 percent increase in overall revenue between the second quarters of 2015 and 2016. That year-over-year deceleration falls in line with what a few notable agencies reported to Adweek late last month—slower growth in cross-client ad spend in the second quarter compared to previous years. (For years, the company has consistently reported an acceleration of revenue growth. Late last year, Facebook executives have warned that advertising revenue growth would slow, given the lack of room for ad load growth.)

Facebook Begins Rolling Out Ads Within Messenger

Facebook is ready to bring ads to new territory: Messenger.

Starting today, the social network is starting to roll out display formats within the previously ad-free app, giving brands a way to be front and center for Messenger’s 1.2 billion users, while also giving Facebook a new place to continue scaling its massive advertising business.

While the ads have been tested in Thailand and Australia since earlier this year, Facebook is now planning to expanding the beta globally, allowing advertisers to access inventory for existing and new campaigns.

According to Facebook product manager Ted Helwick, the ads will appear in the Home tab—the same place where the company has been testing them internationally since January–which a small number of users will begin seeing over the next few weeks.

“This is immediately scalable and applicable for people,” he told Adweek. “And separately we view this as a number of ways we help businesses drive outcomes with people through messenger.”

Given that Messenger has 1.2 billion users, the move points to where Facebook could be heading as it looks for more places to show ads rather than bogging down existing placements. That could be good news for investors—over the past couple of financial quarters, executives have warned that ad load is expected to slow.

Facebook’s existing advertising business is massive. The company isn’t scheduled to report second quarter revenue until later this month. However, ad revenue in the first quarter of 2017 was $7.86 billion, up 51 percent year over year. (Last week, James Cakmak, an analyst with the firm Monness, Crespi, Hardt & Co., estimated Facebook’s second-quarter ad revenue could be up 43.1 percent to total $8.93 billion.)

Asked if Facebook plans to begin reading messages between users for better targeting—much like Google has done for years with Gmail—Helwick said it doesn’t plan on it. Rather, Messenger ads will have the same targeting capabilities available across other Facebook properties such as the newsfeed and Instagram.

read more here:

http://www.adweek.com/digital/facebook-begins-rolling-out-ads-within-messenger/

Facebook introduces New Ad Inventory

As Facebook’s news feed increasingly moves from text to video, the social network is rolling out a new feature on desktop that makes clips more prominent.

In February, Facebook rolled out a mobile feature called watch and scroll that lets people keep watching organic videos and ads as they scroll through news feeds. Now, the feature is available to all desktop users, meaning consumers who use it can see two videos at once in a news feed, opening up potentially new ad inventory.

Here’s how it works: As users discover videos in their news feeds, they can click on icons that appear on videos or click to turn a clip’s sound on since videos automatically play silently. The side-by-side view then appears on the left side of the screen as users scroll past the clip in the news feed. Users can move the video across the screen. Once a clip is finished, a replay icon briefly appears on the page before the video disappears. Such a “sticky” or “pinned” video player is a tactic many publishers, including CNN and USA Today, have used on their websites to keep video content viewable as users read news articles.

As more users, brands and publishers upload video to the platform, Facebook has actively developed more video products and is reportedly in talks with publishers and creators to make TV-quality original programs specifically for the platform, though Re/code reports the time line for those efforts has been pushed back.

Facebook has also warned investors over the past year about ad load concerns as it begins to max out the ratio of organic posts to ads. Watch and scroll could open up new ad inventory as a way for Facebook to show two videos at once. In recent months, publishers have started adding ad breaks to their clips as a way to make money off of live videos.

read more here:

http://www.adweek.com/digital/facebooks-side-by-side-video-view-could-open-up-new-ad-inventory-outside-the-news-feed/