Disney Reveals Fresh Details of Netflix Killer

Disney’s chairman and CEO Bob Iger has revealed fresh details around the media giant’s upcoming streaming service, touted to be a competitor to the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime. Iger, speaking on a conference call after Disney’s Q3 financial results, spoke of the “tremendous potential” he sees in Disney’s direct-to-consumer services, particularly following the company’s acquisition of 21st Century Fox.

Disney’s earnings themselves were slightly disappointing, with quarterly revenue of $15.2 billion falling short of analysts’ $15.4 billion expectations. Investors on the subsequent earnings call however were much more interested to hear further information about the company’s in-development streaming service, which Iger said is “on track for a late 2019 launch”, and described as the company’s “biggest priority of the 2019 calendar year”.

Iger said he believes the addition of Fox’s portfolio of content will help make Disney’s streaming service “even more compelling for consumers”. The company already had quite a formidable content catalogue before the acquisition, bolstered by the takeover of studios including Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm. The Fox purchase will bring brands such as Searchlight, FX, National Geographic and 20th Century Fox Film under Disney’s roof, adding more variety to content that could be available in Disney’s streaming service.

Iger emphasised that integration of Fox properties into Disney’s direct-to-consumer strategy won’t come at the expense of the movie theatre experience. “We’re obviously very excited to leverage the Fox assets to enhance and accelerate our DTC strategy, but I want to be clear that we remain incredibly supportive and enthusiastic about the movie theatre experience,” he said.

In the Q&A section of the call, investors and analysts were hungry for more specific detail about what Disney’s strategy for its streaming service will be, with Iger giving fresh insight into the company’s plans for the service..

When asked about Disney’s decision to split content over multiple streaming platforms, Iger said the company prefers to offer narrower packages of content at a cheaper price, as opposed to a more Netflix-like model which offers a very wide library of films and TV shows. Disney’s acquisition of Fox will grant it a 60 percent stake in Hulu, and the launch of ‘Disneyflix’ alongside the existing ESPN app will mean content is spread across three different services, but Iger believes this reflects consumers’ desire to pick and choose which content they have access to.

“Rather than one, let’s call it, gigantic aggregated play, we’re going to bring to the market what we’ve already brought to market, sports play,” said Iger. “I’ll call it Disney Play, which is more family-oriented. And then, of course, there’s Hulu. And they will basically be designed to attract different tastes and different segment or audience demographics.”

Iger also shed light on how the company plans to handle issues around existing licensing deals for some of its content. As Sanford Bernstein analyst Todd Juenger pointed out, popular film franchises like Star Wars and the Marvel Cinematic Universe are already tied into distribution deals with other streaming services.

Iger confirmed that some content produced by Disney-owned studios won’t be available on Disney’s streaming service, at least initially, with Star Wars: The Force Awakens for example being unavailable due to an existing distribution deal. He said however that in some of these deals, there will be opportunities down the road to put those films on Disney’s service, and that any content produced from 2019 and beyond will be unencumbered by any such deals. “What we have been doing is making sure that since the time that we made the decision to bring the service out, we’ve not done anything that further encumbers any of our product,” he said.

read more here: videoadnews.com

Disney is about to go to war with Netflix

Disney may be closing in on a media-industry-rocking deal to acquire a collection of assets from 21st Century Fox. CNBC reports that a deal, which would include Fox’s movie studios, could be announced as soon as next week.

The deal comes as media companies look for ways to survive as consumers shift their attention to ad-free streaming services from Netflix and Amazon, cut the cord in increasing numbers and spend an inordinate amount of time glued to mobile screens and social media.

Disney’s already declared that it is going to war with Netflix by launching its own streaming service. Already Disney has some big assets to offer subscribers to this potential service, including movies made by its own studios and the rights to mega-hits like Star Wars. But it’s going to need as many big guns as it can get in that fight. If the future is less about cable bundles and classic TV advertising, and more about bringing content directly to paying subscribers, giants like Disney can’t stand pat. That’s where Fox comes in.

As one industry observer put it, “nobody knows what the business model of the future is. But if you have a lot of content, you’re either going to get people to pay for it, run ads in it, or license it to somebody. So this is a pretty good hedge for Disney.”

read more here: www.cnbc.com

Google starts Unplugged Streaming TV Service

Alphabet’s (GOOGL) Google unit has reached a final agreement or one in principle with CBS (CBS) , Disney (DIS) , Viacom (VIAB) and 21st Century Fox (FOXA) and could launch its streaming video service as soon as February, according to people with knowledge of Google’s plans.

Time Warner (TWX) is in talks as well, but they haven’t yet progressed as far as the others, said one person with knowledge of the situation.

The video streaming service, Google Unplugged, will be operated by Google’s YouTube service and will join a growing number of subscription video-on-demand offerings lining up to offer consumers so-called skinny bundles of networks that are less expensive than those offered by cable or satellite operators.

The service initially was expected to be announced at the Consumer Electronics Show that begins in Las Vegas on Jan. 5, but unspecified technology delays and the need to finalize contracts have pushed it back to February or later, according to two knowledgeable people.

The crowded field of cablelike streaming services includes DirecTV Now, which AT&T’s (T) DirecTV satellite service launched in November, as well as Sony’s (SNE) PlayStation Vue service and Dish Network’s (DISH) Sling TV.

read more here:

https://www.thestreet.com/story/13934933/1/google-lines-up-cbs-disney-fox-for-unplugged-streaming-video-service.html