Snapchat introduces new 5 min TV shows

Snapchat has introduced a new format for its original video programming. Snap Originals are TV shows developed exclusively for the app, with new 5-minute episodes released each day.

All the shows will include six-second, non-skippable ads, building an important new revenue source for the company. Snap Originals will feature prominently on the app’s Discover page and will also each have their own Show Portal. Users can swipe up from the show episode and access additional, related content, including interactive, AR experiences with selected scenes, lenses, filters and other entertaining ways to share the show with friends.

Snapchat already offers third-party video content under the format Shows. The company said viewer time spent on Shows has tripled since the start of this year.

Snap also announced that NBCUniversal extended its content production commitments through 2019, and Viacom has committed to creating 10 new Snap Originals. Viacom also committed to syndicating at least 500 episodes of its network’s shows to the Snapchat audience.

read more here: snap.com

Viewership on Snapchat’s Original Content Shows Promise

Snap held its Q2 2018 earnings call today and it was a mixed bag of emotions for the company. While it revealed an impressive 44% rise in revenue Y/Y, the company also announced a 3 million drop in DAUs Q/Q, as it attempts to compete with Instagram. One main feature Snapchat has been investing in to give it an advantage in this fight is its Discover Section.

The section houses a slate of Snapchat Original Series and Snapchat Channels belonging to networks and studios like NBC and Elizabeth Murdoch’s Vertical Networks. While Speigel didn’t have much to say about the Discover Section, he did state in his opening remarks that the number of people that watch Publisher Stories and Shows on iOS every day has grown by more than 15 percent this year.

“Additionally, more Snaps from publisher stories and shows were viewed in July than any other month in our history,” added the CEO. Additionally, in Q2 2018, 11 Shows reached a monthly audience of over 10 million users, up from 7 in Q1 2018.

This increase in viewership is a promising sign for the company, which has been itching for a way to attract more advertisers to its platform. Between November 2017 and January 2018, just 397 brands bought video ads on Snapchat Discover channels, according to advertising intelligence platform MediaRadar. It’s a small number when compared to Facebook, which has more than 5 million advertisers; Twitter, which reported having 130,000 advertisers at the end of 2015; and Instagram, which has over half a million advertisers.

Speigel didn’t give much detail about his future plans for the Discover section or how much money the company planned to invest in its original content. Current shows in the section include “The Rundown” and “Face Forward” from E! News, “Stay Tuned” from NBC News, “Sports Center” from ESPN, “Phone Swap” and “Ghost Hunt” from Vertical Networks, which garner a combined 15 million views an episode.

read more here: thevideoink.com

Reality Fuels Golden Age of Documentaries

You’re on the couch. It’s been a long day. The remote control is in your hand. What can you watch?

There’s that new CNN documentary series on the pope. Or maybe you’re more in the mood for some sinners in “Girls Incarcerated” on Netflix? There are cute critters on Hulu’s “March of the Penguins 2: The Next Step” or you could watch former slugger David Ortiz as he figures out his next career step on Fusion.

Keep scrolling? Sure. What about a new three-part documentary about Silicon Valley on Science? Or the series about gangsters on Reelz? How about the A&E series on adults returning to high school in “Undercover High”? What about some David Bowie or Elvis on HBO?

If you’re looking for documentaries these days, they’re hard to miss. Once considered more medicinal than entertaining and consigned to high-brow places like PBS and art house theaters, documentaries are scattered across the film and TV spectrum, as well as online portals like Facebook Watch or YouTube Red and on video streaming apps like go90. Even mighty NBC is getting in on the act with a documentary on Martin Luther King Jr. airing Saturday night.
“It feels like the golden age of documentary right now,” says Josh Koury, a professor at Pratt Institute and a documentary filmmaker. “It’s an amazing time to be making documentary stories.”

Starz, which last fall began offering new documentaries for the first time, has doubled down by adding four original docuseries to its summer schedule, exploring everything from the criminal justice system to the legacy of hip-hop.

Jeffrey Hirsch, chief operating officer for Starz, says the boom owes a large part to technology, which has allowed filmmakers access to relatively inexpensive high-quality cameras and editing equipment. What has emerged for content-hungry platforms is often a cheaper alternative to scripted films and series.

“The cost of creating these stories has come down, I think. The ability to travel and to actually be your own investigative journalist has become possible. And the world has gotten smaller through technology,” he said. “So I think the opportunity to relive or retell some of these stories has become a lot more accessible.”

Showtime also has increased its output of documentaries, said Vinnie Malhotra, head of documentary programming for the network. He marvels at how much the landscape has changed from 15 years ago when docs were independently financed and had limited releases.

“There are more outlets for documentary than there ever have been before,” he said. “There’s a lot of money being fueled into the documentary industry from newer platforms that have emerged with interest in the form of storytelling — places like Netflix, places like Amazon, other streaming and tech companies.”
No wonder recent documentaries have lately found themselves at the center of popular culture, including Ava DuVernay’s “13” on the American prison system, the Oscar-winning “O.J.: Made in America,” ″The Jinx” about Robert Durst, and “Blackfish,” for treatment of orcas. Netflix scored its first Oscar this year with the documentary “Icarus.”

Award-winning filmmaker Darren Aronofsky has been lured to the genre, executive producing National Geographic’s 10-episode “One Strange Rock” about planet Earth — and he’s brought Will Smith along to narrate.

The lure of documentary-making has also recently attracted Judd Apatow, known for scripted comedies like “Knocked Up” and “The 40-Year-Old Virgin.” Said Apatow: “I’ve probably wanted to make one for a very long time but didn’t know how to approach it.”

In 2016, he teamed up with Michael Bonfiglio on “Doc & Darryl” for ESPN’s “30 for 30″ series and last year’s “May It Last: A Portrait of the Avett Brothers” on HBO. This month he’s on his own with a four-hour HBO documentary about Garry Shandling.

“I’m endlessly fascinated by how we all deal with this life. Sometimes it’s fun to write about it but lately I seem much more interested in trying to capture how different people have chosen to live,” Apatow said.

“We’re in an amazing environment where, as a result of all these streaming services and cable stations, they desperately want great documentaries,” he added. “Now we’re getting incredible documentaries. I couldn’t be happier about it.”

Many thank Sheila Nevins for bringing documentaries into mainstream popular culture during her 38-year tenure at HBO. It was Nevins, president of HBO Documentary Films from 2004 until this year, who shook up the staid format — usually nature shows or archive footage explained by experts — with such lurid shows as “Taxicab Confessions” and “Real Sex.”

“When I arrived at HBO, docs were considered a high-brow thing. That never interested me. I didn’t care about the life of the university professor. I care about his doorman,” she says.

Under Nevins’ watch, HBO pumped out more than 1,200 documentaries, most recently with such films as the Scientology investigation “Going Clear” and the Oscar-winning “Citizenfour,” about Edward Snowden. HBO once tried to hide its offerings as “docutainment.” Now it proudly has a documentary tab on its home page.

read more here: tvnewscheck.com

Four Steps to Successfully Negotiate Rates with Influencers

There’s more hype surrounding YouTube Influencer Marketing than ever. Even though collaborations with creators on social media have driven results, Influencer Marketing is still a young industry with rapidly shifting benchmarks: especially when it comes to compensating creators for the work they do.

At the end of the day, it’s always a negotiation between brand/agency and creator. However, here are some helpful tips that will help you and the influencer you’re building a relationship with leave the negotiation table on good footing:

Step 1: Find a Baseline: Views vs. Reach

Reach

First, figure out what you want: do you want to reach, do you want views, or do you want both?

Influencers determine their monetary worth based on their subscriber count or the views they get. Expect to pay about $1,000 USD for every 100,000 subscribers an influencer has on YouTube.

A good rule of thumb to abide by as you do your influencer research is to take a look at how many views on average an influencer’s videos are getting. If you see that views on a creator’s content — on average — represent roughly 20% or more of the total subscriber count — then you can safely assume that their subscribers are real and the content isn’t stale.

Don’t feel any pressure to go big either. Try booking a diverse portfolio of creators and test what works best for your brand. As we’ve seen through hundreds of campaigns on the Grapevine Influencer Marketing platform, micro-influencers yield increased engagement.

Views

If you’re leveraging an Influencer Marketing Platform, you should be able to access insights to metrics such as clicks, click through rates (CTR), cost-per-view (CPV), and more. These are additional tools to help you negotiate for better pricing.

Take a look at the performance of influencers with similar follower counts that work in the same industry and base expectations and benchmarks from there. There is a strong correlation between view count and cost. For example, breaking 100,000 views costs $3,000 USD. Expect to see creators negotiate up based on their views. Likewise, you can use view counts to negotiate down if you need to.

Whether it be views or reach, it really all comes down to how well your targeted influencer can sell. If a video gets 10,000 views but yields 500 conversions, then that’s a success! This is only the beginning of your negotiation process. It’s critical that you use this step as only a baseline for your booking process. The best marketers do their due diligence to ensure that these influencers actually drive a return on your investment.

Step 2: Negotiate Content

Have a clear idea or vision of what kind of content you want the targeted influencer to share. Do you want just a shout out at the beginning of a video or something more integrated? This impacts how much compensation a creator might ask for to promote your campaign, product, or brand. If you need conversions: be sure to equip the creator exclusive (and maybe even generous) offer to help drive more leads.

If you want to build a successful collaboration: give yourself and the creator some time to volley back and forth between ideas to ensure that your content actually resonates. Influencers are busy and the best ones usually have packed content calendars. Build campaigns around a 4-6 week buffer before content actually starts being published. This is especially important to keep in mind if you’re creating campaigns based on holidays or special events.

Step 3: Track and Test

If you thought booking and scheduling content was the end of your negotiation process: you thought wrong! Assign an internal champion on your team to keep close track of the engagement your collaboration is driving with a close eye on clicks and click-through-rate.

If it’s not driving the engagement you need, it might be worth re-negotiating with the influencer, finding someone new, or adjusting your offer/content produced.

Step 4: Collaborate Again

When you work with an influencer you are also building a relationship with someone that could potentially even be a brand ambassador. Think of how some NBA players are either fiercely loyal to Adidas or Nike. That’s all because of the relationships they’ve built with their contacts at those organizations.

read more here: www.thevideoink.com

Paying for Content with Data Instead of Dollars

If the TV advertising market is around $80 billion in the U.S., and worldwide revenues for all streaming services are around $21 billion, how will the streaming business model evolve to compete? That was the question posed by John Penney, EVP, strategic partnerships, Twentieth Century Fox during the panel “Consumer Preferences for Personalized Content Viewing” at CES 2017 on Monday. The answer, according to the panelists, is today’s viewers are paying with data instead of dollars.

Advertising vs. the Skinny Bundle

According to a Consumer Technology Association (CTA) study in 2017, more than half of U.S. consumers watch streaming content every day. 75% of U.S. adults reported that they pay for TV subscriptions, and 53% pay for streaming services, said Lesley Rohrbaugh, senior manager, market research, for the CTA. “In total, more than 37% of the general population have paid TV and streaming services.”

These viewers are watching on a variety of devices, and the data consumers are providing is giving publishers and brands the ability to provide free content in exchange for finding out much more about their viewers than the TV environment ever did. However, things are still in the early adopter stage in many perspectives, where viewers tend to be younger and more tech savvy. “From the content side, it’s critical that you all remember the world can’t just shift to subscription content,” said Penney. “(They) can’t just shift to streaming because there’s not enough money in that overall.”

“When you disconnect from an established bundle with an MPVD and add broadband costs into the mix, many consumers are finding that the price is actually higher than they want. [We’ve] seen a lot of SVOD services come and go in the last year as a result,” said Eric Berger, CDO, Sony Pictures Television Networks and GM of Crackle. Crackle provides ad-supported content on 25-30 different applications.

“Crackle happens to be a free service, and the logic behind that is that there’s always room for free in your personal bundle,” said Berger. “There’s a lot of free ad-supported services that are growing quite quickly (to address this).” However, as any viewer knows, free so far has meant either a heavy ad load or a request for personal information.

The Cost of Free

Are consumers selling their souls, or at least their personal information, for access to the content they want? Yes. “We have the ability to reach a consumer at a specific point in time, at a specific location, with a specific service, through a specific technology,” said Jonathan Steuer, chief research officer, Omnicom Media Group. The challenge is to be able to do so without creeping out the customer. One audience member asked how much data should they provide and the panel said there’s no formula, but more is generally better.

The benefit of providing personal information to the viewer is being able to save things in a que, pause and resume across different devices, in different locations for Crackle viewers. Crackle introduced the singe-ad ad pod for binge viewers. “A Nielsen labs study found it had six times the brand recall and seven times the purchase intent of a regular linear TV ad,” said Berger.

Different Strategies for Different Generations

The comfort level on the data transaction is proving to be generational. “Boomers didn’t expect there to be a world of targeted advertising at all. So every new step (to provide information) matters a lot to them,” said Steuer. Therefore, easier to lose them by being too confusing or asking for too much.

read more here: www.streamingmedia.com

Survey: 58% UK smartphone owners watching video – while walking

More than half (53 per cent) of 16-75-year-olds in the UK use their smartphones while walking – the equivalent of around 22 million people – according to the latest research from Deloitte. For younger consumers aged 16-24, the proportion rises to 74 per cent. Worryingly, more than 4.5 million people (11 per cent of respondents) also admit to using their smartphones while crossing the road. This proportion almost doubles for 16-24-year-olds (21 per cent).

Deloitte’s seventh annual Mobile Consumer Survey, State of the smart, which analyses the mobile usage habits of 4,150 people in the UK, has found that 85 per cent of 16-75-year olds now own or have access to a smartphone. This is an increase of four percentage points from 2016 and 33 percentage points from 2012. For 18-24-year-olds, market penetration is at a record 96 per cent.

“Most people can relate to ‘smartphone zombies’, either through being one or bumping into one,” noted Paul Lee, head of research for technology, media and telecoms at Deloitte, comments. “But this is just one indication of just how infatuated we are with these devices, for better or worse. While we may be glued to our smartphones, it is important to acknowledge that these devices are also, increasingly, the glue that is binding society together, and will soon become the primary way to communicate, interact and transact with customers and fellow citizens.”

Swipe out
Deloitte’s research shows that the UK’s continued love of smartphones continues to affect almost every aspect of daily life, including night-time. Among 16-19-year-olds, two-thirds (66 per cent) check their phones in the middle of the night, double that of all UK respondents (33 per cent). More than a quarter of ‘screenagers’ (26 per cent) actively respond to messages they receive after falling asleep at night.

More than a third (34 per cent) of respondents look at their smartphones within five minutes of waking, and over half (55 per cent) do so within a quarter of an hour. At the end of the day, more than three-quarters (79 per cent) check their smartphones within the last hour before going to sleep.

Deloitte’s research also reveals that half of all UK meals taken at home with friends or family, approximately 20 million per week, are disrupted by individuals using their smartphones.

“If the first 10 years has been about changing our social lives, the next 10 years will be about changing our working lives,” predicted Dan Adams, UK lead partner for telecoms at Deloitte. “The smartphone’s attractiveness lies in the fact that it is the definitive multi-purpose consumer device: a digital Swiss Army knife with a set of tools that is millions of apps deep.”

“Importantly, what goes on behind the smartphone’s screen is only getting smarter through machine learning, facial recognition and other technological advancements, so it is a device that will continue to offer an ever-widening array of benefits and challenges for years to come.”

Call to attention: awareness of usage
For the first time, this year’s research has captured smartphone owners’ self-awareness of their device usage. Two-fifths (38 per cent) of respondents believe that they are using their phone too much –around 15.5 million people. Significantly, this perception is most apparent among younger consumers: 56 per cent of 16-24-year-olds believe they are overusing their phone. By comparison, just 16 per cent of those aged 55-64 think they use their phone too much.

In addition, 60 per cent of parents believe their children use their phone too much, and 41 per cent of respondents in a relationship think their partner is spending too much time on their phone.

Of respondents who believe they use their phone too much, 14 per cent are making an effort to control their usage, and are usually succeeding; 34 per cent are making an effort, but are not normally succeeding and a quarter (26 per cent) are not trying to control their usage, but would like to.

“With every year the smartphone is becoming easier and more enticing to use,” added Lee. “The question is: are we at the point at which smartphones have become almost too good for people to cope with, and if so, what remedies might be required? Interestingly, the steps that people are taking to control smartphone usage have a common theme: removing temptation.”

read more here:
http://advanced-television.com/2017/09/20/survey-58-uk-smartphone-owners-watching-video/

Mobile video consumption flattens

According to the Q2 2017 Global Video Index from video software and services provider Ooyala, video consumption on mobile devices stayed essentially flat in the second quarter of 2017. The quarter’s report also tracks global variances in video consumption including greater Q/Q growth for tablet viewing, mobile growth in global markets, as well as emerging trends in online video advertising.

For the second consecutive quarter, long-form content — greater than 20 minutes in length — now represents the majority of time spent watching video across all screen sizes, with mobile devices being the platform of choice between 2.4 to 3.3 times more than personal computers.

Much of that is due to the increasing amount of premium content that services are now making available to all devices. As longer content becomes more prevalent, an increasing number of users — across all demographics — are as comfortable watching longer form content on smaller screens as they are watching it on big screens. And they’re simply watching more content in general.

By device, data finds long-form content now represents:

– 96 per cent of all time spent watching video on connected TVs, down marginally from 98 per cent the quarter before;
– 82 per cent on tablets, also up slightly from 81 per cent in Q1;
– 53 per cent on computers, down from 65 per cent in Q1;
– 53 per cent on smartphones, marginally down from 55 per cent in Q1

Global video consumption

Mobile viewing continues to be a major driver of OTT growth, despite the plateau in growth in Q2 2017. Although mobile plays were dominant in every region, Ooyala found that mobile plays in Asia pacific made up nearly three quarters of all plays at 72 per cent, the highest in the world, a 21.9 percent variance in consumption over North American viewers. EMEA at 12.6 per cent and Asia Pacific at 14.1 per cent saw the highest percentage of tablet plays.

Regionally, the study finds:

– In EMEA, mobile plays represent 57.7 per cent of all video plays, up from just 54.1 per cent in Q1;
– In North America, mobile represents slightly more than half of all video plays; for the fourth consecutive quarter;
– In APAC, 72 per cent of all video plays are on mobile, up from 61 per cent in Q1;
– In LatAm, mobile plays topped 56 per cent. After consecutive quarters of mobile play share increasing 7.5 per cent in Q4 2016 and 8.4 per cent in Q1 2017, mobile this quarter grew just 0.1 per cent

read more here:

http://advanced-television.com/2017/09/15/mobile-video-consumption-flattens/

Netflix CFO hints content spending could get more cautious

Netflix CFO David Wells said his company’s nearly unparalleled content spending could become more cautious, particular as competition increases for top content.

Speaking today at a Goldman Sachs investor conference, Wells said Netflix could possibly become more budget constrained in the future, but as long the company is able to grow the top-line and operating margin, it will continue to invest in content.

As more competitors like Amazon, Apple and Facebook look ready to spend big money for top-tier content, Wells said the bidding for that content is getting higher. He said that you have to have confidence that you’re going to monetize it effectively—confidence he said Netflix gets from its subscribers totals—but he insisted that Netflix is still disciplined on price.

When bidding on content, Wells said Netflix considers the cost and compares it to how similar content has already performed in order to determine the efficiencies Netflix can expect.

“If there’s more competition for top-tier content, we may end up producing one less show,” Wells said.

Wells’ comments seemingly had a positive effect on Netflix stock, as shares rose nearly 2% while he was speaking.

Netflix, of course, has been one of the most aggressive companies in terms of spending on content. Its $6 billion content budget for 2017 puts its ahead of SVOD rivals like Amazon Prime Video and premium programmers like Time Warner’s HBO.

While Netflix continues to spend heavily on content, the threat of price increases for the services continues to loom. When asked directly about future price increases, Wells was careful to not specifically point to when prices would increase, but instead frame his answer around building more value into the platform.

read more here:

http://www.fiercecable.com/online-video/netflix-cfo-hints-content-spending-could-get-more-cautious

NBC creates pop-up websites to try out content

NBC News wanted to mix up its news coverage to include more “near news”: content someone reads after they get their fix of breaking news and politics – or as a relief from it.

Two pop-up sites, future-oriented “Mach” and self-improvement site “Better,”officially launched May 31 with a fresh web design to test the content and ad experience with NBC News’ audiences.

NBC News’ strategy to create content aligned with passion has been popular among publishers lately. HuffPost created content for introverts, for example, and distributed to its social followers. Mic launched nine new content channels in March tailored to micro-interests.

“Publishers have an opportunity to tap into passion points with content that small sections of a broader audience can attach themselves to from an identity and interest perspective,” said NBC News executive editor Ashley Parrish. “Writing about tech and innovation as a siloed vertical allows us the resources build out a separate team and for editors to hone in on topics.”

NBC News chose to create content around technology and wellness because those areas historically performed well with its audience. Readers trusted NBC News to report on those topics, Parrish said. Mach started out as a subsection on the NBC News website in November, and Better joined in March, before getting a completely new look last week.

Since the beginning of the year, traffic on Mach grew 100%, making it the fastest-growing section across all of NBC News. Better, which started creating content in March, has grown 60% since launch.

After making the sites look as clean as possible within the existing design, NBC News product head Moritz Gimbel created a new design for the sites. To speed up the process,the internal team collaborated with outside agency Code & Theory.

read more here:

https://adexchanger.com/publishers/nbc-news-created-pop-sites-try-new-content-design/

YouTube clarifying video ad guidelines for content

Amid blowback from marketers upset about ads being placed on videos deemed inappropriate, YouTube is now taking steps to help creators better understand video ad guidelines for content.

For starters, YouTube has updated is advertising-friendly guidelines for its creator community.

“While it’s not possible for us to cover every video scenario, we hope this additional information will provide you with more insight into the types of content that brands have told us they don’t want to advertise against and help you to make more informed content decisions. We know our systems aren’t perfect and we’re also working to further improve your ability to appeal impacted videos,” the company wrote in a blog post.

Among the types of content listed as not eligible for advertising are controversial issues and sensitive events; drugs and dangerous products or substances; harmful or dangerous acts; sexually suggestive content; and violence.

Newly add content types include hateful content; inappropriate language; incendiary or demeaning content; and inappropriate use of family entertainment characters, which specifically states that those characters cannot be depicted engaging in “violent, sexual, vile, or otherwise inappropriate behavior, even if done for comedic or satirical purposes.”

YouTube also announced the launch of the Creator Academy, which is geared toward helping creators make their content appealing for a broad range of advertisers.

“We hope these new policies and guidelines provide additional information you can use to make the right decisions for your content,” the company wrote. “Thank you for being patient with us as we work to improve the ecosystem for creators, advertisers and users.”

read more here:

http://www.fiercecable.com/online-video/youtube-clarifying-video-ad-guidelines-for-content