Three Strategies to fight Netflix

In just a few years’ time, the way we consume entertainment has changed drastically. Netflix and other video streaming services have taken the industry by storm, encouraging consumers to cut the cord and enjoy their content on demand. In fact, last year Netflix users collectively watched 1 billion hours of content each week, and more than 22 million U.S. adults were expected to drop cable services, up 33% from the previous year — a major blow to cable companies.

With streaming on the rise, how can cable outlets keep their current customer base coming back?

Stay Transparent

Open communication is key to maintaining a healthy customer relationship. When it comes to set-up fees, service upgrades or any extra charges, cable providers should be up front about a customer’s tab.

Unexplained price increases are a common cable customer gripe, and with monthly charges up an average of 53% in just a decade, according to S&P Global Intelligence figures cited by the Associated Press, customers are turning to alternate options. Nobody likes seeing an unexpected uptick in their monthly bill — be prepared to explain why things may be changing, and it’ll go a long way toward maintaining customers’ trust.

Tap New Revenue Streams

Who doesn’t like a healthy bottom line? By offering a valuable benefit like customized consumer electronics warranty products for TVs, gaming systems, laptops and more, cable companies can give current customers another reason to stay on board. Include this protection in a customer’s overall package, and you become much more than just a cable provider — you’re a one-stop shop for devices, service and coverage. Plus, you’ll be adding another line of revenue.

Don’t Be a Robot

While consistency in messaging is important when communicating with your customers, train your service reps to avoid being robotic in delivery. Sure, everyone has a script to read, but a simple gesture like asking the customer how their day is going can make a tremendous difference in the tone of a service call.

That interaction can have effects beyond one call as well. Angry customers aren’t hesitant to post bad reviews or recorded conversations online, potentially affecting your reputation. Take Comcast for example, where $300 million was pledged toward an updated customer service strategy. After multiple complaints, the cable giant promised customers incentives like $20 if a representative is late to an appointment, and a redesigned monthly bill to better answer customer questions.

read more here: www.multichannel.com

Will Snapchat’s Data Play Fend Off Competition?

Wall Street investors seem undecided about whether Snapchat is indeed the wave of the future or just a flash in the pan.

But one month after its IPO, the messaging app’s execs are doggedly focused on broadening Snapchat’s appeal to brands—notably direct response-minded companies.

“Snapchat has a perfect opportunity to become a direct response powerhouse, especially for location-based marketing to millennials,” said David Deal, digital marketing consultant. “Though Snapchat needs to mine data about millennials more effectively to beat Facebook and Instagram.”

To that end, effective April 3, millennial marketers will be able to zero in on Snapchat users who are most likely to download their brand’s app, targeting slivers or swaths of the platform’s 160 million users who have shown interest in either the brand or the functionality it’s offering. These app-install ads allow the marketer to set cost-per-download goals in a measure that’s designed to get app marketers of all budgets into Snapchat’s business client pool.

Snapchat, part of Snap Inc., has ramped up its machine-learning and audience-segmenting capabilities for app installs since its beta product went live in October—to date, it had offered only rudimentary targeting tools to a select number of brands. The new system charges ad buyers on a cost-per-thousand-impressions scale that’s based on auction-style, competitive bidding. “[It’s a] cost-efficient way to drive app installs right from Snapchat,” explained Peter Sellis, Snap’s director of monetization product.

Also today, brands can serve follow-up ads (re-marketing, in industry parlance) to those who have interacted with Snapchat’s sponsored lenses, geofilters or videos. Such behavioral data can be employed to reel in everything from a fitness app download, to a test-drive appointment for an automaker to a shoe purchase via ecommerce. The company believes advertisers will want to take aim at consumers in what direct response practitioners call the “consideration stage.”

“We’ve been listening closely to direct response advertisers,” Sellis revealed.

He’s listening for good reason: eMarketer’s latest figures for 2016 had the U.S. app-install advertising space valued at $5.7 billion. Facebook has reportedly, at times, seen up to 20 percent of its ad revenue, which totaled nearly $26.9 billion last year, from app installs. Google is increasingly a huge app-install contender, and Pinterest just last week rolled out its own app-install ads system. So, Snapchat’s competition is fierce.

“Right now, Snapchat doesn’t move users outside its own environment, so we would expect a longer time for user behavior to adapt,” remarked Emmy Spahr, media director at SapientRazorfish. “Pinterest, on the other hand, actively works across other websites and shopping experiences, so users are already engaging with the platform and websites—adding app downloads here would be seen as a value add.”

read more here:

http://www.adweek.com/digital/will-snapchats-data-play-help-fend-off-competition-from-facebook-and-instagram/