Cutting the Cord? That’s So Five Years Ago, Google Says

Young adults these days don’t make a conscious decision about cutting the cord, asserted Serge Kassardjian, global head of media apps business development for Google Play. That was a discussion five years ago. Now, people decide what content they want and decide the best way to get it.

Kassardjian spoke on a New York Advertising Week panel today called “Streaming Is the New Black,” which examined how the business of streaming video is changing. While discussions remains stuck in the “cut the cord” days, he said millennials are all about getting what they want to see in an efficient way.

That’s not the only way the industry is stuck in older ways of thinking. “There’s a new OTT service that comes out every week,” Kassardjian said, and “there’s a new OTT service that closes down the next week.” Throughout it all there’s a certain sameness about these services: They offer similar content and bill in similar ways. Kassardjian would like to see a lot more diversity and experimentation. Why does each service bill by the month? How about daily subscriptions for sports or special events? And why are subscription fees the same for each user? Perhaps services could charge less for subscribers that already have a related service. Rather than finding it confusing, he says subscribers react well to differentiated pricing.

“That’s where the opportunity is and that’s where you can differential from the bundle,” Kassardjian says.

For the OTT services on the market, search and discoverability have become major issues. Just getting noticed is a hurdle when the field is so crowded. “There’s a lot of noise,” Kassardjian said.

One growth area is in live video. While many think of live as best suited for news and sports, live has emerged as a strong area for dramas, as well. Series like Game of Thrones spawn an industry in post-shows and other discussions, so anyone who doesn’t watch the show live isn’t getting the same experience.

“People are being trained about how to react to live,” Kassardjian noted.

Also on the panel was Albert Lai, CTO of Brightcove, who spoke about changing OTT monetization strategies. Many services are trying to work out the ideal business model, he said. Going with subscriptions seems like a straightforward option, but then they do the math and realize they’ll need ad support, as well. But serving ads requires an ad sales teams and a collection of paying advertisers, all things that take time to build up.

“Advertising is still a healthy option to a subset of those OTT offerings,” Lai said.

However, OTT services need to be careful how they implement ads. Today’s viewers—especially young viewers—won’t stand for an experience that’s worse than broadcast. To illustrate that, Lai told how his own three-year-old daughter was put off by a brief buffer delay while watching a program on a tablet. After waiting a few seconds for an ad to load, she was too annoyed to continue and handed the tablet back to Lai. “Broken,” she said.

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http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/ReadArticle.aspx?ArticleID=120803&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+StreamingMediaMagazine-FeaturedArticles+%28StreamingMedia.com%3A+Featured+Articles%29

Is Amazon’s video strategy working?

Amazon is taking a strikingly different approach to Prime Video than rivals such as Netflix and Hulu are with their services. Rather than bundle content together into a single offering, it is providing most of the video in channels that customers must subscribe to separately. It is working very hard to build up the number of channels available to cover every niche and content genre a viewer could possibly want.

There are already 120 content services available through Amazon Channels. The company continues to press to expand that list. It is rumored to be in negotiations with “dozens” of smaller cable channels to buy them. TV channels providing content with unencumbered rights (rights that aren’t locked into exclusive distribution agreements) are of the most interest. Amazon will be able to launch them quickly to a global audience as part of Channels.

Amazon is not just waiting around for other providers to fill out the content available through Prime Video. It is working with companies directly to fill out important genre categories. For example, animated content creator Genius Brands International is partnering with Amazon in the creation of a channel offering targeted at children. Kids Genius Cartoons Plus! will be available Thursday to Amazon Prime members for $3.99 per month. Genius properties such as Baby Genius and Thomas Edison’s Secret Lab will be available as well as non-Genius shows such as Inspector Gadget and Carl Squad.

Building the library of included content with originals, sports

Amazon recognizes that a large collection of content available as part of a basic subscription is critical to success. It gives customers a no-commitment reason to go to the video portal. Once there, Amazon can use its marketing muscle to get them to subscribe to other content. That is why it has committed to spending $4 billion this year on original content. It is spreading the investment around in genre’s like comedy (The Tick), drama (Mozart in the Jungle), and Crime (Bosch.)

It is also plunging into the world of premium sports. Amazon members will be able to watch ten Thursday football games this season, starting this week with the Bears versus Packers. This is the first time Amazon has streamed live content as part of Prime Video membership. It will be a test of the home-grown streaming platform that Amazon uses, as live streaming continues to be challenging for providers.

Is Amazon’s strategy working?

Amazon doesn’t provide any specifics on how many people are watching the content it provides through Prime Video. Luckily, there are other data sources we can draw on to assess how well it is doing.

Last year, Clearleap reported that 75% of Amazon Prime members say they watch video available through the platform. Most, however, see Prime Video as a nice bonus, not the main reason to subscribe. Still, if most of the 66 million Prime members are using the video apps that is certainly a big win for the company. Unfortunately, engagement still lags well behind other online video providers.

According to comScore, Netflix and Hulu are used more than twice as much as Amazon Video. Hulu streaming households watch 28 hours and 54 minutes a month, while Netflix homes watch 26 hours and 54 minutes a month. Amazon video streaming homes watch just 10 hours and 42 minutes a month.

This data strongly suggests that Amazon customers start looking for video somewhere else before they turn to Prime Video. For Amazon to be successful, it will need to reposition Prime Video as the first place its customers turn to when they want entertainment video on television.

Two Strikes and You’re Out: Limelight Measures Viewer Sentiment

When it comes to making sure viewers watch your video, it’s two strikes and you’re out in most cases, according to Limelight Networks’ 2017 State of Online Video Report. When asked “How many times will you let video rebuffer?” 58.2% of U.S. viewers are gone by the second buffer. 16% will leave on the first buffer, and 42.2% will leave on the second buffer. Younger viewers are more forgiving and willing to watch longer than older viewers when rebuffering happens.

The study also found that SVOD is more prevalent in the U.S. than in other countries. U.S. viewers subscribe to 1.67 streaming services per person vs. 1.08 services globally. As for the widespread belief thta cord-cutters are driving streaming services adoption, it turns out cable subscribers worldwide have an average of 1.26 streaming services. That number drops by almost half to .64 services for non-cable subscribers, so having cable service makes consumers twice as likely to have streaming services than a non-cable subscribers.

It’s About the Money

The number one reason in every country for cancelling an SVOD service is cost—rising prices fees will make customers flee. The second most common reason for canceling service was that the content available for viewing was not interesting.

Almost 80% of viewers in the U.S. subscribe to a cable or satellite provider for television service. 55% of them would terminate their cable if the price continues to rise, while 23% said they would leave their provider when they can directly subscribe to just the channels they want online. Millennial males where much less concerned than older people about price (39.5%) and more willing to drop cable when they can subscribe to only the channels they want (29.2%) and when more sports and other live events become available online (16.4%). 10.8% of U.S. viewers said they will never terminate my cable or pay TV subscription.

The SVOD Gender Gap

The favorite viewing content worldwide is movies, followed closely by TV shows, then news and finally sports. However when broken done by gender, men prefer to watch movies and women prefer to watch TV shows. Men 18 – 25 picked movies as their top viewing choice, but their second favorite content is eSports. Women in the same age range prefer TV shows, movies, and user-generated content. The preferred duration for U.S. viewers is 6- to 30-minute clips and shows, followed by 2- to 5-minute pieces. Most video consumption occurs at home both in the U.S. and elsewhere. 60% of viewers are OK with watching a short ad before the video if the content is free. When multiple ads are put into a longer video clip, those OK with the ads drops to only 27.4%. Even if viewers are interested in the product being advertised, only 38% are OK with having ads in their video.

Mobile Vs. Smart TV

The U.S. average viewing time is a little bit more than six and a half hours a week (6.58). 18 – 25 year olds are watching more than average at 7.3 hours per week on a worldwide basis. Millennials are tuning in on their smartphones, while computers are the preferred device for adults 36 and older. When it comes to streaming devices, in the U.S. the largest concentration of viewers (33%) watch streaming content on their smart TV via an online video app, 28% use a video game console, and the remaining devices are pretty much neck-and-neck with Amazon at 22.4%, Roku at 21.2%, and no streaming device at all at 21.2%. What about Apple, which made a splash with its 4K Apple TV announcement yesterday? As of now, only 20.6% of viewers use an Apple TV.

read more here:

http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/News/Online-Video-News/Two-Strikes-and-Youre-Out-Limelight-Measures-Viewer-Sentiment-120486.aspx

If CBS All Access Is the Future of Television, We’re Screwed

Star Trek: Discovery finally debuted last night to mixed but hopeful reviews. The first Trek TV show in a dozen years definitely has promise. What’s yet to be seen is whether that promise makes fans open their wallets.

CBS released the first two episodes of Discovery last night. While the first aired on traditional broadcast CBS, the second was tucked behind a paywall at CBS All Access, the network’s streaming site/app/service for all things CBS. That’s where the remaining 13 episodes of the series’ first season will live, which means that, barring any creative Googling, you’ll pay $6 or $10 monthly for the privilege of watching the newest version of Star Trek.

Trek often portrays a rosy picture of humanity’s future. But CBS’s decision to hide Discovery inside its silo app as a prestige lure for people to pony up is a potentially worrying picture of TV’s future, one in which we’re asked to pay for a slew of single-entity streaming services

SO MANY SERVICES

Netflix was once monolithic in its domination of streaming. But in the past several years, many major copyright owners have gradually withdrawn content from the service, which has come to the fore with approaching departure of 30 Rock. Vanity Fair called it the “end of the wild west” of streaming.

There’s an even bigger exodus on the horizon though: Disney is set to take nearly all of its content off of Netflix and hide it within its own streaming service. This means no more Marvel movies, no more Star Wars, and no more films for keeping your kids busy, unless you pay $5 a month for the Disney app. ESPN, also owned by Disney (and part owned by Hearst, the parent company of Popular Mechanics), will also launch its own streaming service.

This may leave more choice when it comes to programming—after all, owning the copyright makes it pretty easy to leave it up there indefinitely. But it also leaves cord-cutters in a tricky position. If they want to keep current on TV and movies, they’re going to have to subscribe to lots and lots of services.

THE MONEY ADDS UP

For the sake of comparison, a just-above-basic cable television plan from Time Warner/Spectrum costs more than $60 for cable alone, and it only goes up after that. No surprise, then, that the number of cord-cutters is on the rise as people try to shed that fat monthly bill.

What we’re seeing now, though, is that the big cable bundle is starting to be replaced by lots of little ones. Add to the fact that internet providers are slowly introducing data caps on broadband access, with Comcast being the biggest abuser of this, and streaming becomes potentially even more costly since all these services will nom away at your monthly allotted data cap. Add in 4K content and that cap starts to look smaller and smaller.

If you’re paying only for, say, Netflix and Hulu, then the monthly bills don’t seem so bad. But let’s say you want to watch Star Trek. Commercial-free CBS All Access (where you can also watch SO MUCH Big Bang Theory) will cost you $10. Hulu without ads is $12. The most basic, standard definition Netflix plan is $8 for streaming on one device at a time, while going all the way up to four devices + high definition will put you at $12 (there’s a meet-in-the-middle at $10.) Amazon Video comes with Amazon Prime, which costs $99 per year or $10.99 if you go with a month-to-month plan. Disney will be $5 whenever it launches, and ESPN will be around the same price for what sounds like a terrible service where you have to be a cable subscriber already to get any new games.

That’s $55 already, and you haven’t added optional HBO or Showtime streaming through Prime or Hulu or another service (you’re paying $15 and $9 for those, respectively). If you opt for all of these services, your streaming-only bill is hovering at $80. That’s not including the bevy of other Amazon Channels options, from fairly well-known entities like PBS, Starz, and Cinemax down to odd Bollywood channels, B-movie fiestas, and more. A half-dozen services all with their own rules, logins, rates, and headaches.

BUNDLES AND BUNDLES

Now, one could argue that, at the very least, this is better than the old days of the cable bundle, where you might get to choose between a small, medium, and large bundle of channels, but not much more. That’s true. The current streaming environment allows you to pick and choose a bit more. If you only care about watching, say, Star Trek: Discovery, The Handmaid’s Tale, and Twin Peaks: The Return, then you could pay for CBS All Access and Hulu with the Showtime add-on, and cancel them when you’re done.

read more here:

http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/tv/news/a28344/cbs-all-access-bad/

IBM Ramps Up Its AI-Powered Advertising

In recent years, The Weather Company, which produces forecasts for 2.2 billion locations every 15 minutes, has been using its troves of data in ways that go far beyond what’s happening outside. Since its acquisition by IBM in January 2016, the company has also begun swirling deeper and deeper into the world of advertising with the help of Watson, IBM’s artificial intelligence service that’s working on everything from diagnosing diseases to crafting movie trailers. Now, IBM is finally bringing several major components of The Weather Company’s data capabilities under the Watson umbrella with the launch of Watson Advertising this week.

The new division—encompassing data, media and technology services—will offer a suite of AI products for everything from data analysis and media planning to content creation and audience targeting. By integrating The Weather Company’s signature WeatherFx and JourneyFx features along with all of the other data at IBM’s disposal, the company is hoping to transform what is in many ways still a legacy business into a cutting-edge advertising powerhouse.

“Weather impacts your mood and your emotions, and your moods and your emotions are a huge input into your decision-making modality,” says Cameron Clayton, the former CEO of The Weather Company who is now general manager of IBM Watson’s Content and IoT Platform.

Watson Advertising promises to kick start the era of cognitive advertising, a field that has both legacy tech companies and startups seeking to transform every aspect of marketing from image and voice recognition to big data analysis and custom content.

While there are countless ways to use Watson—through dozens of APIs or studio-like projects that can cost millions of dollars—its new advertising division is structured into four units. The flagship service, focused on audience targeting, will utilize Watson’s neural networks to analyze data and score users based on how likely they are to take an action (like purchasing a product, viewing a video or visiting a website). Another piece of the business will use AI for real-time optimization. A third, Watson Ads, will build on a service that launched last year with a number of high-profile brands, employing AI not just for data analysis or targeting but also for content creation. As part of a Toyota campaign, for example, Watson became a copywriter, crafting messaging for the carmaker’s Mirai model based on tech and science fans’ interests.

“The Watson Ad opportunity is an exciting first-to-market idea that advances our learning opportunities in the AI space,” says Eunice Kim, a media planner for Toyota Motor North America. “Not only are we able to create a one-to-one conversational engagement about Prius Prime with the user, but we’re able to garner insights about the consumer thought process that could potentially inform our communication strategies elsewhere.”

There have been plenty of other advertising opportunities for Watson. Earlier this year, it transformed into a doctor, promoting Theraflu while answering questions about various flu symptoms. For Campbell’s, Watson put on its chef’s hat, personalizing recipes within display ads using data about consumers’ locations and what ingredients they had on hand. For a major partnership with H&R Block, Watson turned into a tax expert, deploying an AI smart assistant to help clients find tax deductions.

“Brands are looking to AI as a feature that they might add and what that can do to distinguish them, modernize them and to give them a new look and a competitive edge,” notes Marty Wetherall, director of innovation at Fallon, which created H&R Block’s campaign.

As more marketers become interested in the potential of AI, the rebrand to Watson Advertising allows IBM to separate the advertising capabilities of The Weather Company from its other less-known operations—industries including aviation, insurance, energy, finance—explains Watson CMO Jordan Bitterman. Earlier this year, IBM created the Cognitive Media Council, a group of senior-level executives from agencies and brands that meet a few times a year to shape how marketers think about the future of AI.

read more here:

http://www.adweek.com/digital/ibm-is-bringing-next-level-ai-technology-to-marketers/

Q1 2017 LOCAL WATCH REPORT: TV TRENDS IN US CITIES

This edition of Nielsen’s Local Watch Report focuses on news consumption. News viewing increased from 2015 to 2016 and has shown continued growth in early 2017. But growth isn’t the only good news here.

Perhaps the more astonishing fact is that local news on local broadcast TV stations is the place where people spend the most time consuming news on TV. By far, local news reaches more adults than both national broadcast network news and cable news. In fact, in an average week in the first quarter of 2017, local news reached 40% of persons 25- 54. This compares to 32% for national broadcast news and 17% for cable news. In the same time period, adults spent two hours and 22 minutes watching local news, which is more than double the amount of time spent watching national broadcast news.

Analyzing individual markets, we found that Memphis was the top Set Meter market for time spent watching local news, at three hours and 55 minutes per person per week while Cleveland was the top Local People Meter (LPM) market at three hours and 27 minutes.

We also looked at news consumption through personal digital media. Adults reached by local news on TV surpasses the reach of people consuming news on smartphones and PCs 4 to 1.

TRENDS IN NEWS VIEWING

Adults in the top 25 markets are spending more than 44 billion minutes consuming news in a typical week—up 11% from full-year 2016, and 25% from full-year 2015.

download the full report here:

http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/q1-2017-local-watch-report-tv-trends-in-our-cities.html

Apple Set to Launch Anti-Tracking Update for Safari

Apple’s ‘Intelligent Tracking Prevention’ will arrive on iPhones and iPads tomorrow as iOS 11 is rolled out, preventing third parties from tracking Safari users for more than 24 hours. The update will make life more difficult for advertisers reliant on third party data, as well as for the publishers who support themselves via these advertisers, and six trade groups have penned an open letter complaint against Apple in response.

The new anti-tracking technology, announced earlier this year at WWDC, will also arrive on the desktop version of Safari when macOS High Sierra is released later this month. Safari already blocks third-party cookies by default, but now cross-site tracking will be made more difficult, as websites will have cookies partitioned and deleted if users don’t return regularly to any website which tracks users.

Safari will identify, via machine learning, which domains have the ability to track users across the web. Any cookies stored by these domains will be usable in a third-party context for 24 hours, after which they will be partitioned: stored, but unable to be used in a third-party context. If a user hasn’t visited the original domain in 30 days, the cookies will be purged.

Apple has painted Intelligent Tracking Prevention as a tool for boosting user privacy. “It’s not about blocking ads, the web behaves as it always did, but your privacy is protected,” explained Craig Federighi, SVP of software engineering, at the announcement back in June.

But the advertising industry disagrees. Six trade groups, including the Interactive Advertising Bureau, the Association of National Advertisers, and the 4 A’s, called Apple’s approach “heavy handed” and “bad for consumers” in an open letter. “Blocking cookies in this manner will drive a wedge between brands and their customers, and it will make advertising more generic and less timely and useful,” they said in the letter. “Put simply, machine-driven cookie choices do not represent user choice; they represent browser-manufacturer choice.”

Apple retaliated, saying that the new technology protects users against tracking that is so pervasive it allows websites to “recreate the majority of a person’s web browsing history”. Many commentators however have pointed out that Intelligent Tracking Prevention won’t really affect big domains like Facebook and Google which users visit daily, but will mostly punish smaller publishers.

read more here:

https://videoadnews.com/2017/09/18/apple-set-to-launch-anti-tracking-update-for-safari-amid-advertisers-protests/

Survey: 58% UK smartphone owners watching video – while walking

More than half (53 per cent) of 16-75-year-olds in the UK use their smartphones while walking – the equivalent of around 22 million people – according to the latest research from Deloitte. For younger consumers aged 16-24, the proportion rises to 74 per cent. Worryingly, more than 4.5 million people (11 per cent of respondents) also admit to using their smartphones while crossing the road. This proportion almost doubles for 16-24-year-olds (21 per cent).

Deloitte’s seventh annual Mobile Consumer Survey, State of the smart, which analyses the mobile usage habits of 4,150 people in the UK, has found that 85 per cent of 16-75-year olds now own or have access to a smartphone. This is an increase of four percentage points from 2016 and 33 percentage points from 2012. For 18-24-year-olds, market penetration is at a record 96 per cent.

“Most people can relate to ‘smartphone zombies’, either through being one or bumping into one,” noted Paul Lee, head of research for technology, media and telecoms at Deloitte, comments. “But this is just one indication of just how infatuated we are with these devices, for better or worse. While we may be glued to our smartphones, it is important to acknowledge that these devices are also, increasingly, the glue that is binding society together, and will soon become the primary way to communicate, interact and transact with customers and fellow citizens.”

Swipe out
Deloitte’s research shows that the UK’s continued love of smartphones continues to affect almost every aspect of daily life, including night-time. Among 16-19-year-olds, two-thirds (66 per cent) check their phones in the middle of the night, double that of all UK respondents (33 per cent). More than a quarter of ‘screenagers’ (26 per cent) actively respond to messages they receive after falling asleep at night.

More than a third (34 per cent) of respondents look at their smartphones within five minutes of waking, and over half (55 per cent) do so within a quarter of an hour. At the end of the day, more than three-quarters (79 per cent) check their smartphones within the last hour before going to sleep.

Deloitte’s research also reveals that half of all UK meals taken at home with friends or family, approximately 20 million per week, are disrupted by individuals using their smartphones.

“If the first 10 years has been about changing our social lives, the next 10 years will be about changing our working lives,” predicted Dan Adams, UK lead partner for telecoms at Deloitte. “The smartphone’s attractiveness lies in the fact that it is the definitive multi-purpose consumer device: a digital Swiss Army knife with a set of tools that is millions of apps deep.”

“Importantly, what goes on behind the smartphone’s screen is only getting smarter through machine learning, facial recognition and other technological advancements, so it is a device that will continue to offer an ever-widening array of benefits and challenges for years to come.”

Call to attention: awareness of usage
For the first time, this year’s research has captured smartphone owners’ self-awareness of their device usage. Two-fifths (38 per cent) of respondents believe that they are using their phone too much –around 15.5 million people. Significantly, this perception is most apparent among younger consumers: 56 per cent of 16-24-year-olds believe they are overusing their phone. By comparison, just 16 per cent of those aged 55-64 think they use their phone too much.

In addition, 60 per cent of parents believe their children use their phone too much, and 41 per cent of respondents in a relationship think their partner is spending too much time on their phone.

Of respondents who believe they use their phone too much, 14 per cent are making an effort to control their usage, and are usually succeeding; 34 per cent are making an effort, but are not normally succeeding and a quarter (26 per cent) are not trying to control their usage, but would like to.

“With every year the smartphone is becoming easier and more enticing to use,” added Lee. “The question is: are we at the point at which smartphones have become almost too good for people to cope with, and if so, what remedies might be required? Interestingly, the steps that people are taking to control smartphone usage have a common theme: removing temptation.”

read more here:
http://advanced-television.com/2017/09/20/survey-58-uk-smartphone-owners-watching-video/

Uber Sues Dentsu’s Fetch Media for Click Fraud

Uber Technologies Inc. is accustomed to getting sued. Now it’s doing the suing. And it’s partly because of Breitbart News.

The global ride-hailing company is taking advertising agency Fetch Media Ltd. to court for click fraud, alleging that the firm improperly billed Uber for “fake” online ads and took credit for app downloads it had nothing to do with. Fetch is owned by the world’s fourth-largest advertising company, Japan’s Dentsu Inc.

Uber filed the lawsuit Monday afternoon in U.S. District Court in San Francisco. The company said it discovered something was amiss when it canceled a campaign on the conservative website Breitbart, where Fetch was placing Uber ads. As part of the lawsuit, Uber plans to seek at least $40 million in damages, according to people familiar with the matter, who asked not to be identified disclosing legal plans. Fetch didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

Going on the offensive in court is a rare move for Uber. The company is a plaintiff in only two federal cases, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Meanwhile, it has been a named defendant in about 250 federal cases. The data aren’t comprehensive but show Uber is usually on the defensive.

Online advertising fraud has grown more sophisticated in recent years along with the amount spent on such ads. Fetch has acknowledged the challenge publicly and said it was working with research firm Forensiq to “fight against mobile ad fraud.”
“One of the biggest challenges we face as digital marketers is to reduce mobile ad fraud,” James Connelly, Fetch’s chief executive officer, said a year ago.

Uber learned of the alleged fraud when it was trying to avoid scandal of a different kind. The company had asked Fetch not to post advertisements on Breitbart News, a site run by President Trump’s former chief strategist, Steve Bannon. But it saw ads appearing there anyway.

Fetch pulled ads from all networks that had a relationship with Breitbart, but the move had little effect on the number of people downloading the app, contrary to Fetch’s claims, the complaint said. Uber pays Fetch and other ad networks a fee when a potential customer downloads its app after seeing an ad. Uber alleged that after further inspection, Fetch had a widespread practice of over-billing. Uber claims that Fetch had been attempting to claim credit for app downloads it didn’t generate.

read more here:

http://adage.com/article/digital/uber-sues-dentsu-s-fetch-media-fraud/310503/

Mobile video consumption flattens

According to the Q2 2017 Global Video Index from video software and services provider Ooyala, video consumption on mobile devices stayed essentially flat in the second quarter of 2017. The quarter’s report also tracks global variances in video consumption including greater Q/Q growth for tablet viewing, mobile growth in global markets, as well as emerging trends in online video advertising.

For the second consecutive quarter, long-form content — greater than 20 minutes in length — now represents the majority of time spent watching video across all screen sizes, with mobile devices being the platform of choice between 2.4 to 3.3 times more than personal computers.

Much of that is due to the increasing amount of premium content that services are now making available to all devices. As longer content becomes more prevalent, an increasing number of users — across all demographics — are as comfortable watching longer form content on smaller screens as they are watching it on big screens. And they’re simply watching more content in general.

By device, data finds long-form content now represents:

– 96 per cent of all time spent watching video on connected TVs, down marginally from 98 per cent the quarter before;
– 82 per cent on tablets, also up slightly from 81 per cent in Q1;
– 53 per cent on computers, down from 65 per cent in Q1;
– 53 per cent on smartphones, marginally down from 55 per cent in Q1

Global video consumption

Mobile viewing continues to be a major driver of OTT growth, despite the plateau in growth in Q2 2017. Although mobile plays were dominant in every region, Ooyala found that mobile plays in Asia pacific made up nearly three quarters of all plays at 72 per cent, the highest in the world, a 21.9 percent variance in consumption over North American viewers. EMEA at 12.6 per cent and Asia Pacific at 14.1 per cent saw the highest percentage of tablet plays.

Regionally, the study finds:

– In EMEA, mobile plays represent 57.7 per cent of all video plays, up from just 54.1 per cent in Q1;
– In North America, mobile represents slightly more than half of all video plays; for the fourth consecutive quarter;
– In APAC, 72 per cent of all video plays are on mobile, up from 61 per cent in Q1;
– In LatAm, mobile plays topped 56 per cent. After consecutive quarters of mobile play share increasing 7.5 per cent in Q4 2016 and 8.4 per cent in Q1 2017, mobile this quarter grew just 0.1 per cent

read more here:

http://advanced-television.com/2017/09/15/mobile-video-consumption-flattens/